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I'm writing a tcp proxy that caches tcp chunks in a berkeley db database (see diagram below).

As a stream goes through source proxy, it is sliced into chunks before continuing to the destination proxy.

Chunks are stored in a Berkeley Db database.

Next time a stream goes through the proxy, if a chunk is already in the database, the proxy sends only its reference to the destination proxy that will replay that portion of the stream.

Each record in the database is the following form : Key(Adler32+MD5) Data

there is not timestamp.

My main concern is that the database is ever growing. I need to purge old records once in a while.

I've no clear idea how to do it.

I thought of introducing a timestamp in each record and update it each time I access the record, then run a separate process that will iterate through the database to delete "old" records.

I think it not an elegant way to do it.

Has someone an other/better idea ?

thanks

source ---| tcp proxy |----------| tcp proxy |--- destination

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did you considered redis? –  sherpya Jun 17 '13 at 9:43

1 Answer 1

The solution is to use both a key and a hash for each data. The hash is used to retrieve the location in the DB, and the key to identify the data at that location. Thus, you can control the number of locations used by your cache by controlling the hash function. The key is then used to detect "collisions". There is a lot of writings about hash functions. Simplest ones are simply linear modulo function like h = a*data+b modulo p where a and b are relative prime numbers. This ensures you that not too much collisions are produced. I'm not sure (I can't remember as I didn't use BDB for years now) but I think that BDB provides hashing as needed.

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thanks for you help J.B, but my concern is about maintaining the cache on disk. In memory I've implemented a LRU cache that caches indexes. When a chunk is removed from memory it is kept on disk. On a long run, it will fill the disk. What i want to achieve is to remove "old" chunks stored on disk when a threshold is reached. An "old chunk" is a chunk that was not in memory since a certain time. Your solutions look like a LRU cache ... am i right ? –  Jean Labiche Jun 17 '13 at 13:43
    
That is not really LRU as LRU is time-based. My proposal is independent of data location. My explanations may be not so clear. I propose that in the DB you use hash entries to identify a slot for storing your data. Since there is a bounded number of hashes, you will only have finite bounded number of slots, right ? But of course, hashes may have collisions, so you must identify exactly your data with your real key. Two different chunks may have the same hash but different unique signatures. I am not talking about internal hashing technics, I proposed to use hash values as keys for your data. –  Jean-Baptiste Yunès Jun 17 '13 at 13:52
    
Thanks J.B, thanks for your help. I've edited my comment ... above ... but S.O did not update it. I'm a beginner at S.O (only 2 posts). Please, read my update message in the next comment –  Jean Labiche Jun 17 '13 at 14:09
    
thanks for you help J.B, but my concern is about maintaining the cache on disk. In memory I've implemented a LRU cache that caches indexes. Data chunk are always on disk. When an index is removed from memory it is kept on disk with DATA. On a long run, it will fill the disk. What i want to achieve is to remove "old" chunks stored on disk when a threshold is reached. An "old chunk" is a chunk whose index was not in memory since a certain time. That's why I wanted to add a timestamp ... but I don't know how to do it. –  Jean Labiche Jun 17 '13 at 14:10
    
Well I'm not sure what you are really doing. Do you mean that you have your own LRU management for in-memory data ? Why don't you use native BDB in-memory cache management. DBD is able to cache some of its data to the memory, and using LRU by default. Anyway, why don't you add some time info along the data, and then launch a simple cleaning process over old "entries" when your thresold is reached ? –  Jean-Baptiste Yunès Jun 17 '13 at 14:24

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