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I'm probably missing something trivial here, but it looks like setElement doesn't rebind the events, although both the documentation and the code says it should.

I've tried to recreate the problem with as little code as I could, but it's still quite a bit, so I posted it on Gist:

https://gist.github.com/gooli/baecc277d864e28eb2c7

When I click one of the checkboxes, "selected" is printed on the console as it should. But when I click it again, it doesn't, the input isn't bound to the event any longer.

I'm doing this because I really want to have the template include the <tr> element and not just the inner <td> elements.

Things work fine when I remove the <tr> element, use tagName: 'tr' in the view and use the common this.$el.html(...) formula for rendering.

What am I missing?

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2 Answers 2

Your approach is problematic for a number of reasons.

this.model.each(function(day) {
  that.$el.append(new DayView({model:day}).render().$el);
});

Here you append the DayView elements to the DayListView. You append the $el of each view to the parent view's $el. This is standard when the child elements have a fixed wrapper element. This being the case where you define the tagName attribute. But when you constantly reassign the view's elements, this is problematic.

  1. You add the ItemView element to the parent
  2. You click select
  3. undelegateEvents is called for the ItemView
  4. ItemView's $el and el are populated with the new template
  5. delegateEvents is called for the ItemView

Now what is causing the problem you are having is:

  1. The old ItemView contents are not removed from the parent view
  2. The new ItemView contents are not added to the parent view
  3. The events are delegated to elements that are not in the DOM

My solution for your problem is:

window.DayView = Backbone.View.extend({
  template: Handlebars.compile($('#day-template').html()),
  events: {
    'click .select input': 'select'
  },
  initialize: function () {
    this.model.bind('change', this.render, this);
    this.setElement(this.template(this.model.toJSON()));
  },
  render: function() {
    this.$el.find('.name').text(this.model.get('name'));
    this.$el.find('.select input').attr('checked', this.model.get('selected'));
    return this;
  },
  select: function (event) {
    this.model.set({selected:$(event.target).is(':checked')});
  }
});

This way you don't replace your view's element each and every time a checkbox is clicked. Now this solution is most likely far from optimal, but should point you to the right direction.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Needed to read your answer 3 or 4 times, but I finally got it. Since the list's render isn't called on select, the new element is never added to the DOM. The problem occurs because the events are unbound from the displayed elements and are bound to the one not displayed. OK, cool, thanks. –  gooli Jun 17 '13 at 13:43
    
I wouldn't call the list's render when pressing select. It would be very unnecessary to re-render the whole list every time someone clicks a checkbox! –  jakee Jun 17 '13 at 13:51
    
I agree, and I found a clean solution. See my answer. –  gooli Jun 17 '13 at 13:53
    
if my answer was the right one for you, please do accept is as well! :) –  jakee Jun 19 '13 at 10:21
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Based on jakee's answer, I came up with an even better solution that doesn't require the reimplementation of the template logic inside render.

window.DayView = Backbone.View.extend({
    template: Handlebars.compile($('#day-template').html()),
    events: {
        'click .select input': 'select'
    },
    initialize: function () {
        this.model.bind('change', this.render, this);
        this.setElement(this.template(this.model.toJSON()));
    },
    render: function() {
        console.log('render');
        this.$el.html($(this.template(this.model.toJSON())).html());
        return this;
    },
    select: function (event) {
        console.log('selected');
        this.model.set({selected:$(event.target).is(':checked')});
    }
});

The initialize method uses the entire template to create the element. The render method uses only the inner html of the template to render the new values.

This looks clean and allows me to define all of the view's HTML in the template without relying on tagName. I'm a happy camper.

share|improve this answer
    
html just replaces the contents of the selected node (in this case the tr). In your case this will create a dom structure like this: <tr><tr><tr>...<tr>template content</tr>...</tr></tr></tr>. See jquery docs api.jquery.com/html. –  jakee Jun 17 '13 at 14:02
    
Note that I'm calling html() on the template, which only gives the child <td> elements. So I'm replacing the contents of $el with the contents of the template and it works well. –  gooli Jun 20 '13 at 7:12
    
True that, didn't notice. –  jakee Jun 20 '13 at 10:05

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