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I want cout to output an int with leading zeros, so the value 1 would be printed as 001 and the value 25 printed as 025 .. you get the idea .. how can I do this?

Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

cout << setfill('0') << setw(5) << 25;

output:
00025

setfill is set to space ' ' by default. setw sets the width of the field to be printed, and that's it.

don't forget to include <iomanip> :)


If you are interested in knowing how the to format output streams in general, I wrote an answer for another question, hope it is useful: Formatting C++ Console Output.

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2  
but.. how can I write formatted output to a string (char* or char[]) not to console directly. Actually I am writing a function that returns formatted string –  AnimalsAreNotOursToEat Dec 23 '12 at 9:32
3  
@harsh use std::stringstream –  cheshirekow Apr 30 '13 at 14:51
cout.fill( '0' );    
cout.width( 3 );
cout << value;
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but.. how can I write formatted output to a string (char* or char[]) not to console directly. Actually I am writing a function that returns formatted string –  AnimalsAreNotOursToEat Dec 23 '12 at 9:33
    
@Shashwat Tripathi Use std::stringstream. –  AraK Dec 23 '12 at 10:19
    
@AraK I think this would not work in Turbo C++. I used it using sprintf(s, "%02d-%02d-%04d", dd, mm, yy); where s is char* and dd, mm, yy are of int type. This will write 02-02-1999 format according to the values in variables. –  AnimalsAreNotOursToEat Dec 23 '12 at 12:44

Another way to achieve this is using old printf() function of C language

You can use this like

int dd = 1, mm = 9, yy = 1;
printf("%02d - %02d - %04d", mm, dd, yy);

This will print 09 - 01 - 0001 on the console.

You can also use another function sprintf() to write formatted output to a string like below:

int dd = 1, mm = 9, yy = 1;
char s[25];
sprintf(s, "%02d - %02d - %04d", mm, dd, yy);
cout << s;

Don't forget to include stdio.h header file in your program for both of these functions

Thing to be noted:

You can fill blank space either by 0 or by another char (not number).
If you do write something like %24d format specifier than this will not fill 2 in blank spaces. This will set pad to 24 and will fill blank spaces.

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2  
I know this is an old answer, but it should still be pointed out that sprintf should generally not be trusted too much since you can't specify the length of the buffer it's supposed to write to. Using snprintf tends to be safer. Using streams as opposed to *printf() is also much more type safe because the compiler has a chance to check the parameters' types at compile time; AraK's accepted answer is both type safe and "standard" C++, and it doesn't rely on headers that poison the global namespace. –  Magnus Feb 5 at 14:19

I would use the following function. I don't like sprintf it doesn't do what I want!!

#define hexchar(x)  ((((x)&0x0F)>9)?((x)+'A'-10):((x)+'0'))
typedef signed long long   Int64;

// special printf for numbers only
// see formatting information below
//  Print the number "n" in the given "base"
//  using exactly "numDigits"
//  print +/- if signed flag "isSigned" is TRUE
//  use the character specified in "padchar" to pad extra characters
//
//  Examples:
//  sprintfNum(pszBuffer, 6, 10, 6,  TRUE, ' ',   1234);  -->  " +1234"
//  sprintfNum(pszBuffer, 6, 10, 6, FALSE, '0',   1234);  -->  "001234"
//  sprintfNum(pszBuffer, 6, 16, 6, FALSE, '.', 0x5AA5);  -->  "..5AA5"
void sprintfNum(char *pszBuffer, int size, char base, char numDigits, char isSigned, char padchar, Int64 n)
{
    char *ptr = pszBuffer;

    if (!pszBuffer) 
    {
        return;
    }

    char *p, buf[32];
    unsigned long long x;
    unsigned char count;

    // prepare negative number
    if( isSigned && (n < 0) )
    {
        x = -n;
    }
    else
    {
        x = n;
    }

    // setup little string buffer
    count = (numDigits-1)-(isSigned?1:0);
    p = buf + sizeof (buf);
    *--p = '\0';

    // force calculation of first digit
    // (to prevent zero from not printing at all!!!)
    *--p = (char)hexchar(x%base); 
    x = x / base;
    // calculate remaining digits
    while(count--)
    {
        if(x != 0)
        {
            // calculate next digit
            *--p = (char)hexchar(x%base); 
            x /= base;
        }
        else
        {
            // no more digits left, pad out to desired length
            *--p = padchar;
        }
    }

    // apply signed notation if requested
    if( isSigned )
    {
        if(n < 0)
        {
            *--p = '-';
        }
        else if(n > 0)
        {
            *--p = '+';
        }
        else
        {
            *--p = ' ';
        }
    }

    // print the string right-justified
    count = numDigits;
    while(count--)
    {
        *ptr++ = *p++;
    }

    return;
}
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cout.fill('*');
cout << -12345 << endl; // print default value with no field width
cout << setw(10) << -12345 << endl; // print default with field width
cout << setw(10) << left << -12345 << endl; // print left justified
cout << setw(10) << right << -12345 << endl; // print right justified
cout << setw(10) << internal << -12345 << endl; // print internally justified

This produces the output:

-12345
****-12345
-12345****
****-12345
-****12345
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