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I have a C file which I copied from somewhere else, but it has a lot of comments like below:

int matrix[20];
/* generate data */
for (index = 0 ;index < 20; index++)
matrix[index] = index + 1;
/* print original data */
for (index = 0; index < 5 ;index++)

How can I delete all the comments enclosed by /* and */. Sometimes, the comments are consist of 4-5 lines, and i need to delete all those lines.

Basically, I need to delete all text between /* and */ and even \n can come in between. Please help me do this using one of sed, awk or perl.

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10  
I love the word "but" in "I have a C file, but it has a lot of comments". –  innaM Nov 11 '09 at 14:33
    
@Manni ;-) see stackoverflow.com/questions/1260273/… –  Sinan Ünür Nov 11 '09 at 14:37
1  
No doubt, some comments are crazy. But getting rid of *all comments? –  innaM Nov 11 '09 at 15:45

10 Answers 10

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Why not just use the c preprocessor to do this? Why are you confining yourself to a home-grown regex?

[Edit] This approach also handles Barts printf(".../*...") scenario cleanly

Example:

[File: t.c]
/* This is a comment */
int main () {
    /* 
     * This
     * is 
     * a
     * multiline
     * comment
     */
    int f = 42;
    /*
     * More comments
     */
    return 0;
}

.

$ cpp -P t.c
int main () {







    int f = 42;



    return 0;
}

Or you can remove the whitespace and condense everything

$ cpp -P t.c | egrep -v "^[ \t]*$"
int main () {
    int f = 42;
    return 0;
}

No use re-inventing the wheel, is there?

[Edit] If you want to not expand included files and macroa by this approach, cpp provides flags for this. Consider:

[File: t.c]

#include <stdio.h>
int main () {
    int f = 42;
    printf("   /*  ");
    printf("   */  ");
    return 0;
}

.

$ cpp -P -fpreprocessed t.c | grep -v "^[ \t]*$"
#include <stdio.h>
int main () {
    int f = 42;
    printf("   /*  ");
    printf("   */  ");
    return 0;
}

There is a slight caveat in that macro expansion can be avoided, but the original definition of the macro is stripped from the source.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, this is what I´d use! –  Bart Kiers Nov 11 '09 at 14:58
3  
The preprocessor has a (potentially indesirable) "side-effect" : it also processes macros, includes included files, and so on... –  Raphaël Saint-Pierre Nov 11 '09 at 14:59
4  
You can get rid of macro expansion by -fpreprocessed. I'll update to mention this –  ezpz Nov 11 '09 at 15:04
    
-1 again. That is not a slight caveat if you expect the source code to compile after removing comments. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 11 '09 at 15:16
    
This caveat can be fixed: perl -wpe 's/^\s*#define/#include#define/' your-file.c |cpp -P - -fpreprocessed|perl -wpe 's/#include#define/#include/ ---- this turns any #defines into (somewhat invalid) #includes that pass through the preprocessor, to be converted back to correct #defines later. (If you agree, please add this to the answer itself). –  Yaakov Belch Nov 12 '09 at 10:15

See perlfaq6. It's quite a complex scenario.

$/ = undef;
$_ = <>;
s#/\*[^*]*\*+([^/*][^*]*\*+)*/|("(\\.|[^"\\])*"|'(\\.|[^'\\])*'|.[^/"'\\]*)#defined $2 ? $2 : ""#gse;
print;

A word of warning - once you've done this, do you have a test scenario to prove to yourself that you've just removed the comments and nothing valuable ? If you're running such a powerful regexp I'd ensure some sort of test (even if you simply record the behaviour before/afterwards).

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Just check that the binaries created by compiling are identical (modulo timestamps or other build identification). –  ephemient Nov 11 '09 at 14:34
    
That may well be the simplest solution –  Brian Agnew Nov 11 '09 at 14:44
1  
Agreed, I would never do this on code I cared about unless I had unit tests in place to verify its correctness after filtering it. –  Ether Nov 11 '09 at 17:48

Take a look at the strip_comments routine in Inline::Filters:

sub strip_comments {
    my ($txt, $opn, $cls, @quotes) = @_;
    my $i = -1;
    while (++$i < length $txt) {
    my $closer;
        if (grep {my $r=substr($txt,$i,length($_)) eq $_; $closer=$_ if $r; $r}
        @quotes) {
        $i = skip_quoted($txt, $i, $closer);
        next;
        }
        if (substr($txt, $i, length($opn)) eq $opn) {
        my $e = index($txt, $cls, $i) + length($cls);
        substr($txt, $i, $e-$i) =~ s/[^\n]/ /g;
        $i--;
        next;
        }
    }
    return $txt;
}
share|improve this answer

Please do not use cpp for this unless you understand the ramifications:

$ cat t.c
#include <stdio.h>

#define MSG "Hello World"

int main(void) {
    /* ANNOY: print MSG using the puts function */
    puts(MSG);
    return 0;
}

Now, let's run it through cpp:

$ cpp -P t.c -fpreprocessed


#include <stdio.h>



int main(void) {


    puts(MSG);
    return 0;
}

Clearly, this file is no longer going to compile.

share|improve this answer
    
well, not after you add the -fpreprocessed flag, anyway –  Hasturkun Nov 11 '09 at 18:27
    
@Hasturkun and if you don't add -fpreprocessed, #include <stdio.h> will be expanded. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 11 '09 at 20:50
    
I tried this: perl -wpe 's/^\s*#define/#include#define/' your-file.c |cpp -P - -fpreprocessed|perl -wpe 's/#include#define/#include/ ---- this turns any #defines into (somewhat invalid) #includes that pass through the preprocessor, to be converted back to correct #defines later. –  Yaakov Belch Nov 12 '09 at 10:11

Consider:

printf("... /* ...");
int matrix[20];
printf("... */ ...");

In other words: I wouldn't use regex for this task, unless you're doing a replace-once and are positive that the above does not occur.

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Try this on the command line (replacing 'file-names' with the list of file that need to be processed):

perl -i -wpe 'BEGIN{undef $/} s!/\*.*?\*/!!sg' file-names

This program changes the files in-place (overwriting the original file with the corrected output). If you just want the output without changing the original files, omit the '-i' switch.

Explanation:

perl -- call the perl interpreter
-i      switch to 'change-in-place' mode.
-w      print warnings to STDOUT (if there are any)
 p      read the files and print $_ for each record; like while(<>){ ...; print $_;}
 e      process the following argument as a program (once for each input record)

BEGIN{undef $/} --- process whole files instead of individual lines.
s!      search and replace ...
  /\*     the starting /* marker
  .*?     followed by any text (not gredy search)
  \*/     followed by the */ marker
!!      replace by the empty string (i.e. remove comments)  
  s     treat newline characters \n like normal characters (remove multi-line comments)
   g    repeat as necessary to process all comments.

file-names   list of files to be processed.
share|improve this answer
    
See the perlfaq to understand why this is so very wrong. –  brian d foy Nov 11 '09 at 18:15
    
@brian Accepted: This is only an approximate solution. –  Yaakov Belch Nov 12 '09 at 10:16

When I want something short and simple for CSS, I use this:

awk -vRS='*/' '{gsub(/\/\*.*/,"")}1' FILE

This won't handle the case where comment delimiters appear inside strings but it's much simpler than a solution that does. Obviously it's not bulletproof or suitable for everything but you know better than the pedants on SO whether or not you can live with that.

I believe this one is bulletproof however.

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You MUST use a C preprocessor for this in combination with other tools to temporarily disable specific preprocessor functionality like expanding #defines or #includes, all other approaches will fail in edge cases. This will work for all cases:

[ $# -eq 2 ] && arg="$1" || arg=""
eval file="\$$#"
sed 's/a/aA/g;s/__/aB/g;s/#/aC/g' "$file" |
          gcc -P -E $arg - |
          sed 's/aC/#/g;s/aB/__/g;s/aA/a/g'

Put it in a shell script and call it with the name of the file you want parsed, optionally prefixed by a flag like "-ansi" to specify the C standard to apply.

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1  
why isn't this the most-up-voted answer??? –  Sam Apr 15 at 8:40
1  
I suspect because other posted solutions look simpler but while this one will work ALL of the time, the others will only work SOME of the time and anyone trying it hasn't yet hit those case where their choice of solution fails (or hasn't noticed the failure). Ah, it looks like I had posted this 3 years after the original question was posted and an answer accepted so that's probably a major factor! –  Ed Morton Apr 15 at 16:44
1  
I could remember doing something like this a long time ago. I needed it again for something quick yesterday and I knew the other answers would not cover all cases. I wish I could up-vote it again! –  Sam Apr 16 at 10:51

Try the below recursive way of finding and removing Java script type comments, XML type Comments and single line comments

/* This is a multi line js comments.

Please remove me*/

for f in find pages/ -name "*.*"; do perl -i -wpe 'BEGIN{undef $/} s!/*.*?*/!!sg' $f; done

/* This is a multi line xml comments.

Please remove me*/

for f in find pages/ -name "*.*"; do perl -i -wpe 'BEGIN{undef $/} s!<!--.*?-->!!sg' $f; done

//This is single line comment Please remove me.

for f in find pages/ -name "*.*"; do sed -i 's///.*//' $f; done

Note : pages is a root directory and the above script will find and remove in all files located in root and sub directories as well.

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very simplistic example using gawk. Please test a lot of times before implementing. Of course it doesn't take care of the other comment style // (in C++??)

$ more file
int matrix[20];
/* generate data */
for (index = 0 ;index < 20; index++)
matrix[index] = index + 1;
/* print original data */
for (index = 0; index < 5 ;index++)
/*
function(){
 blah blah
}
*/
float a;
float b;

$ awk -vRS='*/' '{ gsub(/\/\*.*/,"")}1' file
int matrix[20];


for (index = 0 ;index < 20; index++)
matrix[index] = index + 1;


for (index = 0; index < 5 ;index++)


float a;
float b;
share|improve this answer
    
for some reason this is not working on my machine:( cat test int matrix[20]; /* generate data */ for (index = 0 ;index < 20; index++) matrix[index] = index + 1; /* print original data */ and the output is awk -vRS='*/' '{ gsub(/\/\*.*/,"")}1' test int matrix[20]; / generate data / for (index = 0 ;index < 20; index++) matrix[index] = index + 1; / print original data / –  Vijay Nov 11 '09 at 11:46
    
i already indicated, using gawk. do you have gawk? –  ghostdog74 Nov 11 '09 at 11:50
    
sorry, the comment is so messed up, i didn't notice you have output. Well, it worked for me. I see you still have /generate data/ and /print original data/. As you can see from my output, it works for me. –  ghostdog74 Nov 11 '09 at 11:53
    
if you still can't get it to work, there's the perl solution below you can try –  ghostdog74 Nov 11 '09 at 11:54

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