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One of the classes I defined is used in a set() to filter out equal objects. But it doesn't work as I expect it, so I obviously understand something wrong.

class Foo(object):

    def __hash__(self):
        return 7

x = set()
x.add(Foo())
assert len(x) == 1
x.add(Foo())
assert len(x) == 1    # AssertionError

I expect the set to consist of only one element, but it has two. Why is that?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Hash collisions are know to occur in sets (hash maps), no hash algorithm is good enough to have a unique hash for every item, or else it would take a long time to calculate. When a collision does occur, python falls back to checking the equality of the values with __eq__ to make sure they are not the same.

class Foo(object):

    def __hash__(self):
        return 7
    def __eq__(self, other):
        return True

>>> x = set()
>>> x.add(Foo())
>>> assert len(x) == 1
>>> x.add(Foo())
>>> assert len(x) == 1
>>> 

This is a reason why you see frightening runtimes over here but note that you can expect O(1) amortized membership checks in sets, even though they have O(N) worst case (everything is a hash collision). The worst case is very very very unlikely to occur due to Python's smart implementation.

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2  
So I should additionally override __eq__ to get a set of only unique objects? (unique in my context of course) –  Niklas R Jun 17 '13 at 11:23
    
Just seen your edit, thanks! –  Niklas R Jun 17 '13 at 11:23
    
"no hash algorithm is good enough to have a unique hash for every item, or else it would take a long time to calculate" - that's not true (e.g. python's hash(x) where x is an int returns x, so there are no collisions in the hash values), but say the hash table currently has N buckets - the hash table implementation's going to do something like bucket = hash_value % N to pick a bucket, and hash values of X, X + N, X + 2N etc will all collide on the same bucket. You probably know this, but the current wording does say otherwise and may confuse readers.... –  Tony D Nov 25 '13 at 8:33

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