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I wrote a small particle system in Java with the LWJGL.
So therefore I am using openGL.
Now I read, that changing a texture is very slow. So I make sure, that I only change a texture which is used for a bunch of particles and then draw all these particles.
Still my FPS drop from about 8000 to 4000 although there are only 60 particles at the same time drawn.
I know that the problem is the rendering, because when I just update particles but do not draw them, then I have no drop in FPS.
It would be great if someone could tell me what is wrong with my OpenGL code.

This is the particle emitter which manages the particles:

public void render() {
//Initialize....
GL11.glMatrixMode(GL11.GL_MODELVIEW);
BloodParticle.PARTICLE_TEXTURE.bind();

for(Integer index : this.getBlockedParticles()){
    this.getParticles()[index].render();
}

GL11.glDisable(GL11.GL_TEXTURE_2D);
}

This is the render method of a single particle:

public void render() {
if(!this.isAlive()){
    return;
}

// Store matrix
GL11.glPushMatrix();

// Set to particle's position and scale
GL11.glTranslatef(this.getPosition().getX(), this.getPosition().getY(), 0);
GL11.glScalef(3.5f, 3.5f, 1.0f);

// Set the current alpha.
GL11.glColor4f(1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, this.getAlphaFade());

//Draw the texture on a quad.
GL11.glBegin(GL11.GL_QUADS);
{
    GL11.glTexCoord2f(0, 0);
    GL11.glVertex2f(-PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageWidth()/2.0f,
            -PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageHeight()/2.0f);

    GL11.glTexCoord2f(0, 1);
    GL11.glVertex2f(-PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageWidth()/2.0f,
            PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageHeight()/2.0f);

    GL11.glTexCoord2f(1, 1);
    GL11.glVertex2f(PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageWidth()/2.0f,
            PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageHeight()/2.0f);

    GL11.glTexCoord2f(1, 0);
    GL11.glVertex2f(PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageWidth()/2.0f, 
            -PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageHeight()/2.0f);

}
GL11.glEnd();

//Get the matrix again.
GL11.glPopMatrix();
}

I know that 4000 FPS are much more than enough. But I am just scared about this drop to half the FPS and with only one emitter in the game currently.
I know that this will become a problem with a fixed FPS of 60 and more than 3 emitter.

share|improve this question
    
"But I am just scared about this drop to half the FPS and with only one emitter in the game currently." A drop from 8000 FPS to 4000 represents 0.125 milli seconds of time difference. It's not a problem. Measuring by framerate isn't helpful; always measure by time. –  Nicol Bolas Jun 17 '13 at 15:13

1 Answer 1

State changes have nothing to do with your performance problem.

This has:

//Draw the texture on a quad.
GL11.glBegin(GL11.GL_QUADS);
{
    GL11.glTexCoord2f(0, 0);
    GL11.glVertex2f(-PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageWidth()/2.0f,
            -PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageHeight()/2.0f);

    GL11.glTexCoord2f(0, 1);
    GL11.glVertex2f(-PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageWidth()/2.0f,
            PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageHeight()/2.0f);

    GL11.glTexCoord2f(1, 1);
    GL11.glVertex2f(PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageWidth()/2.0f,
            PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageHeight()/2.0f);

    GL11.glTexCoord2f(1, 0);
    GL11.glVertex2f(PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageWidth()/2.0f, 
            -PARTICLE_TEXTURE.getImageHeight()/2.0f);

}
GL11.glEnd();

Think about it: Each and every particle causes 8 calls into OpenGL. At several thousand particles this is a huge overhead. Even worse, you're not even batching several quads into a single glBegin/*glEnd* block.

Here's how to improve performance: Don't use glBegin/glVertex/glEnd aka the immediate mode

Use Vertex Arrays!

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