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I am emulating a client-server socket transaction. Suppose, the client sent some ip packet with

status = send(sock, packet, sizeof(struct iphdr) + sizeof(struct tcphdr),
                    0);

where sock is the socket, packet points to an ip packet (with ip header struct iphdr and tcp header struct tcphdr)

Now, on the server side, I want to use some function that retrieves the data in packet and displays it. The connection between client and server is correctly set up but when trying to use the recv function, I don't get any data. Is recv the right function

So on the client side I have

packet = malloc(sizeof(struct iphdr)+ sizeof(struct tcphdr));

and I use

send(sock, packet, sizeof(struct iphdr) + sizeof(struct tcphdr),
                    0);

on the server side, I declared some char packet[32]; and I used this

recv(sock, packet, 32, 0);

Edit 2 - here's the code

On the client side

Edit on the client side (to shorten, I didn't mention the included libraries, the struct iphdr, tcphdr, the in_chksum function, as well I didn't hydrate the tcp header, for now I just want to test)

struct tcphdr tcp_hdr;
struct ip ip_hdr;
#define PORT 23

    int sendmeifyoucan(SOCKET sock, SOCKADDR_IN * sin , int size ){

struct ip * ip = (struct ip *)malloc(sizeof(struct ip));
struct tcphdr * tcp;
char * packet;
int sock_err;
int psize=0, status = 1;

packet = malloc(sizeof(struct ip)+ sizeof(struct tcphdr));
memset(packet, 0, sizeof(struct ip) + sizeof(struct tcphdr));


ip->ip_len = htons(sizeof(struct ip) + sizeof(struct tcphdr) + psize);
ip->ip_hl = 5;
ip->ip_v = 4;
ip->ip_ttl = 255;
ip->ip_tos = 0;
ip->ip_off = 0;
ip->ip_p = IPPROTO_ICMP;
ip->ip_src.s_addr = inet_addr("127.0.0.1");
ip->ip_dst.s_addr = inet_addr("127.0.0.1");
ip->ip_sum = in_chksum((u_short *)ip, sizeof(struct ip));



        status = send(sock, packet, sizeof(struct iphdr) + sizeof(struct tcphdr),
                0);

        free(packet);

        return 0;
    }


    int main(void)
    {

        int erreur = 0;

        SOCKADDR_IN sin;
        SOCKET sock;

        SOCKADDR_IN csin;
        SOCKET csock;

        int sock_err;


        if(!erreur)
        {
            sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

            if(sock != INVALID_SOCKET)
            {
                printf("La socket %d est maintenant ouverte en mode TCP/IP\n", sock);
                int size = 0;
                /* Configuration */
                sin.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("127.0.0.1"); 
                sin.sin_family = AF_INET;                
                sin.sin_port = htons(PORT);


    if(connect(sock, (SOCKADDR*)&sin, sizeof(sin)) != SOCKET_ERROR)
            {
                printf("Connection à %s sur le port %d\n", inet_ntoa(sin.sin_addr), htons(sin.sin_port));

sendmeifyoucan(sock, &sin,size);
                /* Si l'on reçoit des informations : on les affiche à l'écran */
                            }

    }


                printf("Fermeture de la socket client\n");
                closesocket(csock);
                printf("Fermeture de la socket serveur\n");
                closesocket(sock);
                printf("Fermeture du serveur terminée\n");
            }
            else
                perror("socket");

        }

        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
    }

On the server side

#define PORT 23
int main(void)
{

    int erreur = 0;
    SOCKET sock;

    SOCKADDR_IN sin;
    socklen_t recsize = sizeof(sin);
    SOCKADDR_IN csin;
    char buffer[32] = "";

    int sock_err;


    if(!erreur)
    {
        sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

        if(sock != INVALID_SOCKET)
        {
            printf("La socket %d est maintenant ouverte en mode TCP/IP\n", sock);
            /* Configuration */
            csin.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("127.0.0.1"); 
            csin.sin_family = AF_INET;                 
            csin.sin_port = htons(PORT);
            sock_err = bind(sock, (SOCKADDR*) &csin, sizeof(csin));

            if(sock_err != SOCKET_ERROR)
            {
                sock_err = listen(sock, 5);
                printf("Listage du port %d...\n", PORT);
            }


            if(sock_err != SOCKET_ERROR)
            {
                /* Attente pendant laquelle le client se connecte */
                printf("Patientez pendant que le client se connecte sur le port %d...\n", PORT);

                sock = accept(sock, (SOCKADDR*)&sin, &recsize);
            }

            if(recv(sock, buffer, 32, 0) != SOCKET_ERROR)
            {
                    printf("Recu : %s\n", buffer);
            }
            else
            {
                printf("Impossible de se connecter\n");
            }

            closesocket(sock);
        }
        else
            perror("socket");

    }

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Edit 3 - the headers

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netinet/tcp.h>
#include <netinet/ip.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#define INVALID_SOCKET -1
#define SOCKET_ERROR -1
#define closesocket(s) close(s)
typedef int SOCKET;
typedef struct sockaddr_in SOCKADDR_IN;
typedef struct sockaddr SOCKADDR;

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define PORT 23
share|improve this question
1  
Yes you have to use recv(). Show us some code please. – nouney Jun 17 '13 at 12:25
    
@nouney see my update in my post please – Newben Jun 17 '13 at 12:33
    
What returns send() and recv ?() – nouney Jun 17 '13 at 12:38
    
@nouney send() returns '48' and recv returns nothing... – Newben Jun 17 '13 at 12:38
1  
When you send a structure as is, it may have padding to align it. Can you post your iphdr and tcphdr structs. PLUS can you also let us know what type of socket you are opening in the first place? – Ahmed Masud Jun 17 '13 at 12:42

Okay now I see your problems.

On client side:

First issue (big):

You are not CONNECTING at all.

where is your connect() call on the client side?

If you want to use SOCK_STREAM you need a connect(2) call

In the code snippet:

     if(connect(sock, (SOCKADDR*)&sin, sizeof(sin)) != SOCKET_ERROR) {
        printf("Connection à %s sur le port %d\n", inet_ntoa(sin.sin_addr), htons(sin.sin_port));

        /* Si l'on reçoit des informations : on les affiche à l'écran */
                    }

your sendmeifyoucan() is OUTSIDE the if block { } ;

2nd issue

    struct iphdr * ip = (struct iphdr *)malloc(sizeof(struct iphdr *));

should be

    struct iphdr * ip = (struct iphdr *)malloc(sizeof(struct iphdr));

Otherwise you are in a stack overflow issue.

Third issue (not so big)

you are allocating char *packet but you are not copying anything on to it it's just memset to 0;

Debug accordingly and try again :)

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your response. For the first big issue, I had a copy paste issue, I have edited my post. For the rest, I am going to check ! – Newben Jun 17 '13 at 13:09
    
I still have the same problem, in fact on the server side the response is Recu : but I should get a 0 as the sent packet is set to 0 no ? – Newben Jun 17 '13 at 13:12
    
You have bugs dude :) read the code carefully ...also it's a bad idea to use printf for error reporting because stdout is buffered and a crash may not dump out all the buffer so you won't quite know where things have gone wrong. use fprintf(stderr, "..."); for dumping out messages – Ahmed Masud Jun 17 '13 at 13:17
1  
@Newben You're sending binary data, but you're printing it as text with fprintf(). You can't do that. – nos Jun 17 '13 at 13:27
1  
@Newben You are sending buffer which is 32 bytes, all with the value 0. Then you try to print it as a string (printf("Recu : %s\n", buffer);). Now - what is a string in C ? It is anything up to the first byte with the value of 0. So this will stop at the first byte in your buffer, and print nothing. Note that a byte with the value 0 is different than a byte with the ascii digit '0' – nos Jun 17 '13 at 13:53

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