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I want to reverse the letters of the words in a string and have to store it in the same array.example: i/p: hi how are you o/p: ih woh era uoy. i wrote this programs but it just prints the same string without reversing and the program is not terminating it continues to print something. i cant findout the mistake. please help me and tell me the correct code.

#include<iostream.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include<stdio.h>

void stre(char (&a1)[20], int j1, int i1)
{
    char b[20];
    for(int k=i1-j1;k<i1;k++)
        b[k]=a1[i1-k-1];
    for(k=i1-j1;k<i1;k++);
        a1[k]=b[k];
}


void main()
{
    clrscr();
    int j;
    char a[20];
    gets(a);
    for(int i=0;a[i]!='\0';i++)
    {
        j++;
        if(a[i]==' ')
        { 
            stre(a,j,i);
            j=0;
        }
    }
    stre(a,j,i);
    for(j=0;j<i;j++)
    cout<<a[j];
    getch();
}

friends after your answers i removed the semicolon in the for loop and also initialized j=0 but still i am not able to get the required output now for the i/p:hi how are you o/p:ihh hi hhi hhi. still need your help.

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9  
You are producing a terrible mix of C and C++... Try to stick with C++ streams and formatted Input in your case. –  bash.d Jun 17 '13 at 12:31
    
not sure if duplicate, but a similar question is here: stackoverflow.com/questions/12879348/… –  Default Jun 17 '13 at 12:38
1  
A gets on an array of 20 char? Any use of gets is an error, but with only 20 char, it's an error almost certain to manifest itself rather quickly. –  James Kanze Jun 17 '13 at 12:56
    
And for what it's worth: a much simpler (and better) solution would be to break the string up into words, and call std::reverse on each word. –  James Kanze Jun 17 '13 at 12:58
1  
Not to mention that there's no such header as <conio.h> on must systems, and it's deprecated where it exists, that j is never initialized, and that main isn't allowed to return a void. –  James Kanze Jun 17 '13 at 13:01

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

try

  #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;


       int main() {

int j =0;
char a[20] = "hi how are you";
char b[20] = "";
    int l=0;
    for(int i=0;a[i]!='\0';i++){

        if(a[i]==' ' ||a[i+1]=='\0'){
          cout<<j<<' '<<i;
           if(a[i+1]=='\0'){
               b[l++] = ' ';


           }


          for(int k=i;k>=j;k--){
              b[l]=a[k];
              l++;
          }
          for(int k=j;k<=i;k++){
            cout<<b[k];
            a[k] = b[k];
          }  


        cout<<endl;
        j = i+1;

        }
    }
   cout << a;
    return 0;

  }
share|improve this answer
    
i guess the OP is first making a temporary copy in the array b and then copying character by character to the original array. So, running the loop completely (And not until half of the length) is correct. –  Karan Jun 17 '13 at 12:54
    
@user85030 oh yes, I have updated my answer –  user2404546 Jun 17 '13 at 19:38
for(k=i1-j1;k<i1;k++);
  a1[k]=b[k];

The semilcolon after the for loop prevents the last action from occuring multiple times.

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This for loop is terminated by the semi-colon:

for(k=i1-j1;k<i1;k++);
                    ^^^
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Here's a version that is not perfect by any means, but at least, it tries to be more like C++ than C:

http://ideone.com/f5vciW

first: tokenize into words and space sequences

//the spaces should be preserved
std::string test("hi   how are you"),reference("ih   woh era uoy");
 std::vector<std::string> tokens;
tokenize(test,tokens);

then reverse the tokens

for (auto& token : tokens)
    std::reverse(token.begin(),token.end());

assemble tokens into a string buffer

std::stringstream buf;
for (auto token : tokens)
    buf<<token;

check the result

std::string res=buf.str();
assert(res==reference);

where the tokenizer looks like that:

template <typename TContainer,typename TString>
void tokenize(TString input,TContainer& res)
{

    if (input.length()<2) {
        res.push_back(input);
        return;
    }

    typename TString::const_iterator pos=input.begin();
    bool space_state=std::isspace(input[0],std::locale());
    for (typename TString::const_iterator it=input.begin(); it!=input.end();
            ++it) {
        bool is_space=std::isspace(*it,std::locale());
        if (is_space!=space_state) {
            res.push_back(TString(pos,it));
            pos=it;
            space_state=is_space;
        }
    }

    //the rest
    if (pos!=input.end()) {
        res.push_back(
         TString(
          pos,
          static_cast<typename TString::const_iterator>(input.end())
         ));
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Surely that's going to reverse the order of the words. The OP wants to keep the words in the same order, but reverse the letters in each word. See his example above the code. –  nurdglaw Jun 17 '13 at 12:37
    
here's an updated answer. The tokenizer can be definitely further refactored, as well as the rest of the code ... It works for your example at least –  Dmitry Ledentsov Jun 17 '13 at 13:59
    
check out the even shorter, and more efficient answer: stackoverflow.com/a/17147560/847349 –  Dmitry Ledentsov Jun 18 '13 at 12:14

you passed j without assigning the value. so it will be garbage.

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I can see two things in your code that may not result in the expected output:

1)

int j;

should be replaced with

int j=0;

And

for(k=i1-j1;k<i1;k++);
    a1[k]=b[k];

the semicolon after the for loop needs to be removed.

FYI, this mixing of C and C++ code is not recommended (it's compromising readability). please stick to either one of them.

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A similar example is shown on this site. They've also used almost the same approach that you'v e chosen(reversing each word by counting number of spaces) by with the help of stack data structure.

Make sure you have the STL library installed in your environment to run this code.
Better run this code on linux platform.

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Here's another, shorter version, doing the inversion in-line without using an extra buffer:

http://ideone.com/hs9NZ7

the criterion for the tokenizer is the change in the isspace condition:

auto next_token=
 [&](char c) {
       return std::isspace(c,loc)!=std::isspace(*pos,loc);
 };

using that we can go through the input string and visit the tokens:

for (auto it=std::find_if(pos,test.end(),next_token);
          it!=test.end();
          it=std::find_if(pos,test.end(),next_token))

reversing them and updating the current position

std::reverse(pos,it);
pos=it;

and not forgetting the leftover token.

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