Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As a C++ neophyte trying to understand smart pointers. I have written below code to check.

It did compile and run but I was expecting the destructor of my class to be invoked and print the cout's from the destructor but it didn't .

Do we need to overload any function in the user defined class so that its destructor is called when the smart_ptr object of that class gets destroyed.

Why is that it did not invoke the object destructor. What is that i am missing?

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <tr1/memory> 
#include <string>

//using namespace std;

class myclass
{
public:
  myclass();
  myclass(int);
  ~myclass();
private:
  int *ptr;
  std::string *cptr;
};

myclass::myclass()
{
    std::cout << "Inside default constructor\n";
}

myclass::myclass(int a)
{
   std::cout << "Inside user defined constructor\n" ;
   ptr = new int[10];
   cptr = new std::string("AD");
}

myclass::~myclass()
{
    std::cout << "Inside destructor..\n";
    delete [] ptr;
    delete cptr;

    std::cout << "Freed memory..\n";
}

int main()
{


   int i;
   std::cin >> i;       
 std::tr1::shared_ptr<std::string> smartstr(new std::string);
 std::tr1::shared_ptr<myclass> smart_a(new myclass(i));
   if(i == 0)
   {
      std::cout << "Exiting...\n";
      exit(-1);
   }


}
share|improve this question
    
Did you exit, or just allow main to return? Does it behave the same in both cases? –  Useless Jun 17 '13 at 14:12
1  
I thought I'd give goldenmean a chance to spot the difference :) –  Useless Jun 17 '13 at 14:17
    
@Useless: I went down the exit(-1) path. But I get the point from the answers below. –  goldenmean Jun 17 '13 at 14:22
    
For completeness, you should replace the call to exit() with an exception throw. Then you will see the destructor gets called. –  juanchopanza Jun 17 '13 at 14:30
1  
@juanchopanza: You'll also need to handle the exception to be sure that the stack is unwound. –  Mike Seymour Jun 17 '13 at 15:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The reason the object is never destroyed is because you are exiting the program by calling exit. This causes the program to exit before the smart pointer objects have a chance to go out of scope thus the objects they manage are never destroyed. Since you are in main use a return statement instead of calling exit.

share|improve this answer

And, as additional information to other answers, note from the Standard:

Per §3.6.1/4:

Terminating the program without leaving the current block (e.g., by calling the function std::exit(int) (18.5)) does not destroy any objects with automatic storage duration (12.4).

share|improve this answer

In the code below,

if(i == 0)
{
   std::cout << "Exiting...\n";
   exit(-1);
}

You are terminating the program by calling exit(), so the object is never destroyed. So remove the exit(-1); from the code.

share|improve this answer

One possible solution is ensure that your buffer is flushed in your destructor. Use std::endl; in your destructor. For more information, please look here: Buffer Flushing, Stack Overflow

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.