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It's not obvious from the documentation when glVertexAttribPointer should be called. It looks like it's part of VBO initialisation, but I notice example code calling it during rendering.

glVertexAttribPointer(vertexAttributeId, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(Vertex2D), reinterpret_cast<const GLvoid*>(offsetof(Vertex2D, m_x)));

Should glVertexAttribPointer be called during initialisation of a GL_ARRAY_BUFFER or should it be called during rendering (after a call to glBindBuffer)?

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Maybe the question you should ask is what does it do, not when it should be called. If you know what it does, then when to call it is obvious. And if you think "it's part of VBO initialization", then your idea of what this function does is very wrong. –  Nicol Bolas Jun 17 '13 at 15:16
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@NicolBolas It stores the offset of the attribute data (from the currently bound buffer)? And the attributeId is the location of the attribute in the shader (retrieved from glGetAttribLocation or set via glBindAttribLocation)? –  Mark Ingram Jun 17 '13 at 15:21
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"It stores the offset of the attribute data (from the currently bound buffer)?" Dangerously incomplete. It also stores the buffer object to be used for that attribute (as well as format information and stride data for it). –  Nicol Bolas Jun 17 '13 at 15:26
    
What is your favourite OpenGL learning resource, by the way? –  Christian Rau Jun 18 '13 at 14:47
    
@ChristianRau I mostly read the docs on the OpenGL site. Nicol's site is excellent as well. –  Mark Ingram Jun 18 '13 at 15:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The function glVertexAttribPointer specifies the format and source buffer (ignoring the deprecated usage of client arrays) of a vertex attribute that is used when rendering something (i.e. the next glDraw... call).

Now there are two scenarios. You either use vertex array objects (VAOs) or you don't (though not using VAOs is deprecated and discouraged/prohibited in modern OpenGL). If you're not using VAOs, then you would usually call glVertexAttribPointer (and the corresponding glEnableVertexAttribArray) right before rendering to setup the state properly. If using VAOs though, you actually call it (and the enable function) inside the VAO creation code (which is usually part of some initialization or object creation), since its settings are stored inside the VAO and all you need to do when rendering is bind the VAO and call a draw function.

But no matter when you call glVertexAttribPointer, you should bind the corresponding buffer right before (no matter when that was actually created and filled), since the glVertexAttribPointer function sets the currently bound GL_ARRAY_BUFFER as source buffer for this attribute (and stores this setting, so afterwards you can freely bind another VBO).

So in modern OpenGL using VAOs (which is recommended), it's usually similar to this workflow:

//initialization
glGenVertexArrays
glBindVertexArray

glGenBuffers
glBindBuffer
glBufferData

glVertexAttribPointer
glEnableVertexAttribArray

glBindVertexArray(0)

glDeleteBuffers //you can already delete it after the VAO is unbound, since the
                //VAO still references it, keeping it alive (see comments below).

...

//rendering
glBindVertexArray
glDrawWhatever

When not using VAOs it would be something like that:

//initialization
glGenBuffers
glBindBuffer
glBufferData

...

//rendering
glBindBuffer
glVertexAttribPointer
glEnableVertexAttribArray
glDrawWhatever
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Take care with deleting buffers If a buffer object that is currently bound is deleted, the binding reverts to 0 (the absence of any buffer object, which reverts to client memory usage). –  t.niese Jun 17 '13 at 14:52
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The point when the glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, ...) actually takes effect and when it's safe to change is a common point of confusion (and goes back to the fact that VBOs have been violently clubbed into the existing client array API driven by back-ward compatibility). A glVertexAttribBuffer function would have made more sense, though they recently cleared that up a bit (but those new functions mentioned by t.niese's answer introduce other confusions). –  Christian Rau Jun 17 '13 at 15:05
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@MarkIngram You can unbind it freely after glVertexAttribPointer (I have to search for the deleting case though, I have to admit, but unbinding has to work, anything else is a driver bug or SO question). It's different for the GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, of course, since that binding is directly stored in the VAO so should be kept bound if you want to do indexed rendering. –  Christian Rau Jun 17 '13 at 15:13
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@t.niese Thanks, but this sounds like it should at least be done after the glBindVertexArray(0). Still I won't add this into the code comment (I already hated it to be two lines long ;)). –  Christian Rau Jun 17 '13 at 15:31
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@MarkIngram As concluded by the comments, you can delete the VBO, but you need to unbind the VAO beforehand. –  Christian Rau Jul 2 '13 at 7:57

glVertexAttribPointer is something that does not really belong to the Buffer nor to the Program it is - let's say - the glue between them. (The functionality of this is splitten in Opengl 4.3 in different functions VertexAttrib*Format, VertexAttribBinding and BindVertexBuffer aviable through the ARB_vertex_attrib_binding )

But if you want to say that it is part of something i would say it is part of the VAO that stores the state of which Buffer objects are bound, which attribs are enabled and how the Buffer data has to be passed to the Program.

So it belongs to part where you setup your VAOs.

EDIT Simple setup that illustrates the order:

  1. creating/setup of Buffers and creating programs
  2. create VAO define which attribs are enabled, which buffers should be bound when the VAO is used and how that data is passed to the program (glVertexAttribPointer)
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glVertexAttribPointer has to be called (in most cases) when the appropriate (i.e. the one you want to use) VBO is bound. Then last parameter to it is offset in said buffer.

The last parameter is defined particularly nice in the reference manual:

Specifies a offset of the first component of the first generic vertex attribute in the array in the data store of the buffer currently bound to the GL_ARRAY_BUFFER target. The initial value is 0.

Appropriate Vertex Pointer Bindings with VBO sources are stored inside VAO, and you should use that if possible.

Short example (excuse my pseudocode):

// Setup
CreateVAO(); BindVAO();
CreateVBO(); BindVBO();
VertexAttribPointer(/*id*/ 0, 3, GL_FLOAT, /*starting at offset*/ 0);

// We have specified Vertex attribute bound to location 0,
// with size of 3 floats, starting at offset 0 of VBO we've just created.        

//Draw
BindVAO();
Draw();
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"glVertexAttribPointer has to be called (in most cases) when the appropriate (i.e. the one you want to use) VBO is bound." - Meh, rather the other way around. Binding of the VBO should be guided by when glVertexAttribPointer is called (and that is guided by either VAO setup time, or rendering time when not utilizing VAOs). –  Christian Rau Jun 17 '13 at 14:35
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Well, a glVertexAttribBuffer function would be much more intuitive anyway, but that's OpenGL. –  Christian Rau Jun 17 '13 at 14:59
    
@ChristianRau IMHO that's pretty much the same, but I am not going to argue about semantics; also the community seems to agree with your answer more. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jun 17 '13 at 15:00
    
@ChristianRau We can only hope for 4.4/5.0 doing something better in that regard. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jun 17 '13 at 15:01

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