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I want to make my application to run other people's code, aka plugins. However, what options do I have to make this secure so they don't write malicous code. How do I control what they can or can not do?

I have stumbled around that JVM has a "built in sandbox" feature - what is it and is this the only way? Are there third-party Java libraries for making a sandbox?

What options do I have? Links to guides and examples is appreciated!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You are looking for a security manager. You can restrict the permissions of an application by specifying a policy.

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  • Defining and registering your own security manager will allow you to limit what the code does - see oracle documentation for SecurityManager.

  • Also, consider creating a separate mechanism for loading the code - i.e. you could write or instantiate another Classloader to load the code from a special place. You might have a convention for loading the code - for example from a special directory or from a specially formatted zip file (as WAR files and JAR files). If you're writing a classloader it puts you in the position of having to do work to get the code loaded. This means that if you see something (or some dependency) you want to reject you can simply fail to load the code. http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/ClassLoader.html

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Have a look at the java-sandbox project which allows to easily create very flexible sandboxes to run untrusted code.

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1  
Thanks for posting that library, it makes something I'm working on a lot easier. –  Brett Lempereur Aug 10 '13 at 9:15

For an AWT/Swing application you need to use non-standard AppContext class, which could change at any time. So, to be effective you would need to start another process to run plug-in code, and deal with communication between the two (a little like Chrome). The plug-in process will need a SecurityManager set and a ClassLoader to both isolate the plug-in code and apply an appropriate ProtectionDomain to plug-in classes.

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Here's how the problem can be solved with a SecurityManager:

https://svn.code.sf.net/p/loggifier/code/trunk/de.unkrig.commons.lang/src/de/unkrig/commons/lang/security/Sandbox.java

package de.unkrig.commons.lang.security;

import java.security.AccessControlContext;
import java.security.Permission;
import java.security.Permissions;
import java.security.ProtectionDomain;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.WeakHashMap;

import de.unkrig.commons.nullanalysis.Nullable;

/**
 * This class establishes a security manager that confines the permissions for code executed through specific classes,
 * which may be specified by class, class name and/or class loader.
 * <p>
 * To 'execute through a class' means that the execution stack includes the class. E.g., if a method of class {@code A}
 * invokes a method of class {@code B}, which then invokes a method of class {@code C}, and all three classes were
 * previously {@link #confine(Class, Permissions) confined}, then for all actions that are executed by class {@code C}
 * the <i>intersection</i> of the three {@link Permissions} apply.
 * <p>
 * Once the permissions for a class, class name or class loader are confined, they cannot be changed; this prevents any
 * attempts (e.g. of the confined class itself) to release the confinement.
 * <p>
 * Code example:
 * <pre>
 *  Runnable unprivileged = new Runnable() {
 *      public void run() {
 *          System.getProperty("user.dir");
 *      }
 *  };
 *
 *  // Run without confinement.
 *  unprivileged.run(); // Works fine.
 *
 *  // Set the most strict permissions.
 *  Sandbox.confine(unprivileged.getClass(), new Permissions());
 *  unprivileged.run(); // Throws a SecurityException.
 *
 *  // Attempt to change the permissions.
 *  {
 *      Permissions permissions = new Permissions();
 *      permissions.add(new AllPermission());
 *      Sandbox.confine(unprivileged.getClass(), permissions); // Throws a SecurityException.
 *  }
 *  unprivileged.run();
 * </pre>
 */
public final
class Sandbox {

    private Sandbox() {}

    private static final Map<Class<?>, AccessControlContext>
    CHECKED_CLASSES = Collections.synchronizedMap(new WeakHashMap<Class<?>, AccessControlContext>());

    private static final Map<String, AccessControlContext>
    CHECKED_CLASS_NAMES = Collections.synchronizedMap(new HashMap<String, AccessControlContext>());

    private static final Map<ClassLoader, AccessControlContext>
    CHECKED_CLASS_LOADERS = Collections.synchronizedMap(new WeakHashMap<ClassLoader, AccessControlContext>());

    static {

        // Install our custom security manager.
        if (System.getSecurityManager() != null) {
            throw new ExceptionInInitializerError("There's already a security manager set");
        }
        System.setSecurityManager(new SecurityManager() {

            @Override public void
            checkPermission(@Nullable Permission perm) {
                assert perm != null;

                for (Class<?> clasS : this.getClassContext()) {

                    // Check if an ACC was set for the class.
                    {
                        AccessControlContext acc = Sandbox.CHECKED_CLASSES.get(clasS);
                        if (acc != null) acc.checkPermission(perm);
                    }

                    // Check if an ACC was set for the class name.
                    {
                        AccessControlContext acc = Sandbox.CHECKED_CLASS_NAMES.get(clasS.getName());
                        if (acc != null) acc.checkPermission(perm);
                    }

                    // Check if an ACC was set for the class loader.
                    {
                        AccessControlContext acc = Sandbox.CHECKED_CLASS_LOADERS.get(clasS.getClassLoader());
                        if (acc != null) acc.checkPermission(perm);
                    }
                }
            }
        });
    }

    // --------------------------

    /**
     * All future actions that are executed through the given {@code clasS} will be checked against the given {@code
     * accessControlContext}.
     *
     * @throws SecurityException Permissions are already confined for the {@code clasS}
     */
    public static void
    confine(Class<?> clasS, AccessControlContext accessControlContext) {

        if (Sandbox.CHECKED_CLASSES.containsKey(clasS)) {
            throw new SecurityException("Attempt to change the access control context for '" + clasS + "'");
        }

        Sandbox.CHECKED_CLASSES.put(clasS, accessControlContext);
    }

    /**
     * All future actions that are executed through the given {@code clasS} will be checked against the given {@code
     * protectionDomain}.
     *
     * @throws SecurityException Permissions are already confined for the {@code clasS}
     */
    public static void
    confine(Class<?> clasS, ProtectionDomain protectionDomain) {
        Sandbox.confine(
            clasS,
            new AccessControlContext(new ProtectionDomain[] { protectionDomain })
        );
    }

    /**
     * All future actions that are executed through the given {@code clasS} will be checked against the given {@code
     * permissions}.
     *
     * @throws SecurityException Permissions are already confined for the {@code clasS}
     */
    public static void
    confine(Class<?> clasS, Permissions permissions) {
        Sandbox.confine(clasS, new ProtectionDomain(null, permissions));
    }

    // Code for 'CHECKED_CLASS_NAMES' and 'CHECKED_CLASS_LOADERS' omitted here.

}
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