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I have a partial that needs to have some controller logic run before it can render without issue. Is there some way to associate the partial with some controller logic that is run whenever it is rendered?

For example, this is what my current code looks like:

MyDataController:

class MyDataController < ApplicationController
  def view
    @obj = MyData.find(params[:id])
    run_logic_for_partial
  end

  def some_method_i_dont_know_about
    @obj = MyData.find(params[:id])
    # Doesn't call run_logic_for_partial
  end

  def run_logic_for_partial
    @important_hash = {}
    for item in @obj.internal_array
      @important_hash[item] = "Important value"
    end
  end
end

view.html.erb:

Name: <%= @obj.name %>
Date: <%= @obj.date %>
<%= render :partial => "my_partial" %>

some_method_i_dont_know_about.html.erb:

Name: <%= @obj.name %>
User: <%= @obj.user %>

<%# This will fail because @important_hash isn't initialized %>
<%= render :partial => "my_partial" %>

_my_partial.html.erb:

<% for item in @obj.internal_array %>
  <%= item.to_s %>: <%= @important_hash[item] %>
<% end %>

How can I make sure that run_logic_for_partial is called whenever _my_partial.html.erb is rendered, even if the method isn't explicitly called from the controller? If I can't, are there any common patterns used in Rails to deal with these kinds of situations?

share|improve this question
1  
why not make push the important hash into the model? –  Ian Kenney Jun 17 '13 at 16:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should be using a views helper for this sort of logic. If you generated your resource using rails generate, a helper file for your resource should already be in your app/helpers directory. Otherwise, you can create it yourself:

# app/helpers/my_data.rb
module MyDataHelper
    def run_logic_for_partial(obj)
        important_hash = {}
        for item in obj.internal_array
            important_hash[item] = "Important value" // you'll need to modify this keying to suit your purposes
        end
        important_hash
    end
end

Then, in your partial, pass the object you want to operate on to your helper:

# _my_partial.html.erb
<% important_hash = run_logic_for_partial(@obj) %>
<% for item in important_hash %>
    <%= item.to_s %>: <%= important_hash[item] %>
<% end %>

Or:

# app/helpers/my_data.rb
module MyDataHelper
    def run_logic_for_partial(item)
        # Do your logic
        "Important value"
    end
end

# _my_partial.html.erb
<% for item in @obj.internal_array %>
    <%= item.to_s %>: <%= run_logic_for_partial(item) %>
<% end %>

EDIT:

As commented Ian Kennedy points out, this logic can also reasonably be abstracted into a convenience method in your model:

# app/models/obj.rb
def important_hash
    hash = {}
    for item in internal_array
        important_hash[item] = "Important value"
    end
    hash
end

Then, you'd access the important_hash attribute in the following manner in your partial:

# _my_partial.html.erb
<% for item in @obj.important_hash %>
    <%= item.to_s %>: <%= item %>
<% end %>
share|improve this answer
    
I see what you're saying. I made a couple of edits that I think make your approach a little more clear. Do they look right to you? –  Kevin Jun 17 '13 at 17:10
    
They make sense, though they don't do anything substantively different from what my original code did. One thing to point out: you've suggested assigning @obj.important_hash to an instance variable from within your view partial (then iterating through it), which isn't considered standard practice. I wouldn't do it, and based on other posters who've rejected the proposed edits, I think it's probably better to go with a more abbreviated, direct approach as I've done in my code. –  zeantsoi Jun 17 '13 at 17:17
    
Just saw your comment as I submitted the edits again xP. One small thing that concerns me about your code sample is that you create the hash, but then you don't ever use it to look up key-value pairs. Of course, I get what you're saying to do -- offload whatever logic into a helper. –  Kevin Jun 17 '13 at 17:20
    
Ahh, in that case, your suggestion does make sense. I've accepted the edit. –  zeantsoi Jun 17 '13 at 17:23
    
Accepted this answer because it includes code samples. –  Kevin Jun 17 '13 at 17:36

What you're trying to do runs against the grain of how Rails controllers/views are designed to be used. It would be better to structure things a bit differently. Why not put run_logic_for_partial into a helper, and make it take an argument (rather than implicitly working on @obj)?

To see an example of a view "helper", look here: http://guides.rubyonrails.org/getting_started.html#view-helpers

share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty new to Rails. Can you please post an example showing how I would do this? –  Kevin Jun 17 '13 at 16:45
    
In that case, I suggest you refer to the Rails Guide which I just added a link to. –  Alex D Jun 17 '13 at 16:47

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