Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have to save how many letters, numbers, whitespaces and lines there are in a string:

char string[2048];
...
string = "aaa 111\nsas 23 d\nds";
for(i = 0; i < strlen(string); i++){
    if (isdigit(string[i]) != 0){
        numbers++;
    } else if (isascii(string[i]) != 0){
        letters++;
    } ...
}

It gaves me many error, "incompatible types when assigning to type ‘char[2048]’ from type ‘char *’" and other errors

What's wrong in that code?

thank you, Lorenzo

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted
char string[2048] = "aaa 111\nsas 23 d\nds";
n = strlen(string);
for(i = 0; i < n; i++){
    if (isdigit(string[i]) != 0){
        numbers++;
    } else if (isascii(string[i]) != 0){
        letters++;
    } ...
}
share|improve this answer

Try,

char string[2048];

strcpy(string,"aaa 111\nsas 23 d\nds");

or

char string[2048] = "aaa 111\nsas 23 d\nds";

Instead of

char string[2048];

string = "aaa 111\nsas 23 d\nds";
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the problem is that I get that string by a read(socket..) from a client.. that code is in the server, the string arrives through a socket, so it's like this: read(client_socket, string, 2048); – Lorenzo Barbagli Jun 17 '13 at 16:49
    
Then there is no need to copy the string ? Just using string directly ? – BlueTrin Jun 17 '13 at 16:53
    
@lore_barba if string is read from client socket then it can be copied using strcpy. Refer cs.cf.ac.uk/Dave/C/node19.html for basics on C & strings – VoidPointer Jun 17 '13 at 16:55
    
yeah you're right, maybe I have to do strcpy.. I haven't tried yet but I think it's the right solution – Lorenzo Barbagli Jun 17 '13 at 21:15

Short version

You declared string as an array of size 2048 of char:

char string[2048];

This line is causing troubles because you assign a char* which is a pointer:

string = "aaa 111\nsas 23 d\nds";

Try the following command which will iterate over the char* and copy the element until reaching the end of the string:

strcpy(string, "aaa 111\nsas 23 d\nds");

If you just want to give an initial value to this char[], use:

char string[2048] = "aaa 111\nsas 23 d\nds";

Long version

What you do is kind of ok in this case but in practice, it can be dangerous to use fixed size arrays of chars. If you were to try to copy a string over 2048 chars you would be writing after the space allocated for this variable.

The reason you cannot just assign is that they are array of chars, it is not an operation really defined in C, the char[2048] is only kind of a pointer on a space of length 2048*sizeof(char). strcpy() will iterate on the second argument and copy the characters until finding 0 which will mark the end of your string.

You may want to check strncpy() as it is safer in the case you have a string larger than the buffer. From the man page:

The stpncpy() and strncpy() functions copy at most n characters from s2 into s1. If s2 is less than n characters long, the remainder of s1 is filled with `\0' characters. Otherwise, s1 is not terminated.

share|improve this answer
    
this was really helpfull! thank you! – Lorenzo Barbagli Jun 17 '13 at 21:14
    
Glad it was useful, by the way,even if you were not using a char[] but a char*, if you were to write string1 = string2, you would not copy the string but just change the pointer value to point to the same memory space. – BlueTrin Jun 18 '13 at 8:42

Use strcpy instead of assigning like string = "aaa 111\nsas 23 d\nds"; or initialize string array as char string[2048] = "aaa 111\nsas 23 d\nds";.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.