Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a cron task placed under myProject/lib/task. This cron works daily for over a year.

However now I have to create a button inside my project to do the same process as the cron whenever my client needs. The code is too complex and I can't rewrite everything on a normal action.

Is there a way to call a cron task from a normal action?

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure it's a cron trask? I think it's a symfony task executed by cron at certain times. What's the purpose of the task? It's a long running heavy weight task with high cpu and/or memory usage or lightweight one? If it's lightweight you should refactor it's code to be reusable in an action. You don't have to rewrite it from scratch. –  1ed Jun 17 '13 at 19:03
    
I'm doing my best to comunicate in english, but a Symfony task executed by cron and a cron task sounds the same to me. This task connects on a external webservice and updates a table and it is complex because the webservice is poorly documented, and their functions has nom-friendly names, so nobody in my team really remembers/understands how this code works since it was write a year ago. –  Susana Santos Jun 17 '13 at 20:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's how you can call a task from an action, you just need to add a link to it and you'll be good. I've used the standard Symfony 'Clear Cache' task in the example, but you can change it to yours:

public function executeRunTaskTest(sfWebRequest $request)
{
  // need to be working in the project root
  chdir(sfConfig::get('sf_root_dir'));

  // init the task we want to run
  $task = new sfCacheClearTask($this->dispatcher, new sfFormatter());

  // run the task
  $task->run(
    array(), // array of arguments
    array(
      'app' => 'frontend',
      'env' => 'prod',
      'type' => 'all',
    ) // array of options
  );

  // back to where we came from
  $this->redirect($request->getReferer());
}

You could also use the PHP exec() or shell_exec() functions, but this Symfony solution is probably easier. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It needs more tests but this is exactly what I was looking for. –  Susana Santos Jun 17 '13 at 20:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.