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Is there any reason why this script always returns "running", regardless of whether my process is started or stopped?

if ps ax | grep -v grep | grep "processName" > /dev/null
then
   echo $"running"
else
   echo $"not running"
fi

Thank you very much

UPDATE : I add a full example of my script, maybe there is something wrong elsewhere.

case "$1" in
  start)
    # Start daemons.

    echo -n $"Starting daemon: "
    ;;

  stop)
    # Stop daemons.
    echo -n $"Shutting down: "
    echo
    ;;
  status)
    pgrep -f "ProcessName" > /dev/null
    if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
        echo $"ProcessName is running"
    else
        echo $"ProcessName is not running"
    fi
    ;;
  restart)
    $0 stop
    $0 start
    ;;

  *)
    echo $"Usage: $0 {start|stop|status|restart}"
    exit 1
esac

UPDATE 2 :

[user@dev init.d]# pgrep -f "MyProcess" > /dev/null
[user@dev init.d]# echo $?
0
[user@dev init.d]# service MyProcess stop
Shutting down MyProcess: Terminated
[user@dev init.d]# pgrep -f "MyProcess" > /dev/null
[user@dev init.d]# echo $?
1

But if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then seems to be TRUE all the time

share|improve this question
2  
To answer your question, yes there is. ;-) –  Robert Massa Nov 11 '09 at 14:05
    
@Mike, what do you see when you remove the output redirection to /dev/null? Is your process, or something similarly named, in fact, running? –  pilcrow Nov 11 '09 at 14:44
    
@pilcrow, When my process is started, I see the result of my process, when the process is stopped, I don't see any result. –  Mike Nov 11 '09 at 14:53
    
@Mike, allow me to clarify: what do you see from your if/grep/echo code -- the code you posted -- when the /dev/null redirection is removed? Show us both when the process is "started" and when "stopped." Do you see one or more lines of ps output? (Maybe your process is SIGSTOP'd, maybe another one has a similar name, etc.) Thanks. –  pilcrow Nov 11 '09 at 15:01
    
@pilcrow, Started : 6628 pts/0 Sl 0:17 /opt/jrockit1.5.0_14/bin/java ..... Not Started : nothing –  Mike Nov 11 '09 at 15:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Try this instead:

ps aux | grep -q "[p]rocessName"
if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
    echo "running"
else
    echo "not running"
fi

The brackets around the first letter of processName means do don't need the "grep -v grep", while the -q means we don't need the pipe to /dev/null

$? gives you the return code of the previous command executed. Hence, testing if it were 0 would indicate if "grep" found what it was looking for.

Update

If your process name is really short (say "cup"), you might get a false positive as it may match other processes too (say "cupsd"). You can overcome this by having grep match whole words - add the "-w" flag.

Not that this technique is not perfect. You may end up matching entries in the username/date fields. If that happens, look up "man ps" and be more selective of what you print out before doing a grep. Alternatively, prefilter the output with awk to extract only the column showing process/cmd name . E.g:

ps aux | awk '{print $11}' | grep -q -w "[p]rocessName"
if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
    echo "running"
else
    echo "not running"
fi

Update 2

you can also use pgrep as suggested in answer below.

For really short process names, you might want to specify word boundaries (\b) before and after your process name to prevent overmatching (as described above)

pgrep "\bprocname\b" > /dev/null
if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
    echo "running"
else
    echo "not running"
fi

Update 3

From the updated question, I see that you're running it from an init script. There's always a danger of pgrep matching the script itself. Try:

pgrep Processname | grep -q -v $$
if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
    echo "running"
else
    echo "not running"
fi

That excludes the PID of the script from pgrep matches.

Update 4

(final update? fingers crossed)

If the init script is run via the "service" command, then we need to filter out the parent PID as well. How about:

pgrep Processname | grep -v $$ | grep -q -v $PPID
if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
    echo "running"
else
    echo "not running"
fi
share|improve this answer
4  
Hey, that's actually a nifty trick with the [p]rocessname - +1 for proving old dogs can learn new tricks. –  paxdiablo Nov 11 '09 at 14:16
    
It returned running all the time when I tried. –  Mike Nov 11 '09 at 14:16
    
He should simply be able to 'if ps aux | grep -q "[p]rocessName"; then echo running; else echo not running; fi' The extra test using [ is unnecessary. –  Emil Sit Nov 11 '09 at 14:19
    
@Mike: What process name are you grepping for. If it returned running all the time you tried, then it must be matching some other process name too (or usernames, or data, or any other output of 'ps aux'). –  Shawn Chin Nov 11 '09 at 14:22
1  
Isc, you're my hero. –  MattC Nov 11 '09 at 16:15

G'day,

As an aside, instead of

ps ax | grep -v grep | grep "processName"

Try doing

ps ax | grep "[p]rocessName"

The ps is listing the grep function because it is seeing the string "grep processName" in the process list which is being passed by your grep for the string "processName".

Grepping for "[p]rocessName" will match just "processName" on its own, but not the string "grep [p]rocessName".

share|improve this answer
    
Good observation. pgrep, or ``ps ax -o comm | grep -q -w commandName'', or any number of shellisms will do. But these are comments on the OP's issue, not answers... –  pilcrow Nov 11 '09 at 15:04

Probably becasue grep "processName" finds itself. I found this self same problem yesterday, except I was xarging the results to kill...

As an alternative you might like to try the pgrep command instead of your string of ps and various greps:

sd@camel:~$ pgrep bash
415
3477
sd@camel:~$ echo $?
0
sd@camel:~$ pgrep arf
sd@camel:~$ echo $?
1
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for reminding me of pgrep :) –  Shawn Chin Nov 11 '09 at 14:36
    
@Stephen, no, the OP excludes ps lines containing "grep" in the middle of his original pipeline. –  pilcrow Nov 11 '09 at 14:43
    
Yes, pgrep is very flexible. –  Adam Goode Nov 11 '09 at 15:06

your not doing a test. put brackets around the test condition like so:

if [ condition your testing ]

share|improve this answer
1  
Without [], the if tests the exit status of the command given, so his script is (in the correct spirit) trying to test the exit of grep. –  Emil Sit Nov 11 '09 at 14:17
    
@Emil yes effectively not testing the condition he wants!! In fact if anyAccessibleCommand without brackets returns true –  ennuikiller Nov 11 '09 at 14:20
1  
Try if /bin/false ; then echo ennuikiller is correct ; fi –  mob Nov 11 '09 at 14:44
    
The OP's problem is that grep returned true when it found itself, not the use of if. –  Emil Sit Nov 12 '09 at 19:41
    
@Emil I didn't say he shouldn't use the if just that using [] syntactically does what his semantics require!! –  ennuikiller Nov 12 '09 at 20:34

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