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There is a straight road with 'n' number of milestones. You are given an array with the distance between all the pairs of milestones in some random order. Find the position of milestones.

Example:

Consider a road with 4 milestones (a,b,c,d) :

a ---3Km--- b ---5Km--- c ---2Km--- d

Distance between a and b is 3

Distance between a and c is 8

Distance between a and d is 10

Distance between b and c is 5

Distance between b and d is 7

Distance between c and d is 2

All the above values are given in a random order say 7, 10, 5, 2, 8, 3.

The output must be 3, 5, 2 or 2, 5, 3.

Assuming the length of the give array is n. My idea is:

  1. Calculate the number of milestones by solving a quadratic equation, saying it's x.
  2. There are P(n, x-1) possibilities.
  3. Validate every possible permutation.

Is there any better solution for this problem?

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Why 5-2-3 is not an answer? –  sethi Jun 17 '13 at 17:55
2  
@bapusethi Because it doesn't contain milestones with distance 8? –  svick Jun 17 '13 at 17:59
    
but 8 is there @svick –  sethi Jun 17 '13 at 18:03
1  
@bapusethi no, it isn't. The output distances should be in the order of the milestones. –  AJMansfield Jun 17 '13 at 18:08
2  
@bapusethi Where? You have: ab=5, ac=7, ad=10, bc=2, bd=5, cd=3. I don't see any 8. –  svick Jun 17 '13 at 18:08

4 Answers 4

I can't find an algorithm for this that has good worst-case behaviour. However, the following heuristic may be useful for practical solution:

  • Say the first landmark is at position zero. You can find the last landmark. Then all other landmark positions need to appear in the input array. Their distances to the last landmark must also appear.
  • Let's build a graph on these possible landmark positions.
  • If a and b are two possible landmark positions, then either |a-b| appears in the input array or at least one of a and b isn't a landmark position. Draw an edge between a and b if |a-b| appears in the input array.
  • Iteratively filter out landmark positions whose degree is too small.

You wind up with something that's almost a clique-finding problem. Find an appropriately large clique; it corresponds to a positioning of the landmarks. Check that this positioning actually gives rise to the right distances.

At worst here, you've narrowed down the possible landmark positions to a more manageable set.

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Ok. I will give my idea , which could reduce the number of permutations.

Finding n, is simple, you could even run a Reverse factorial http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/171882/is-there-a-way-to-reverse-factorials

Assumption: Currently I have no idea of how to find the numbers. But I assume you have found out the numbers somehow. After finding n and elements we could apply this for partial reduction of computation.

Consider a problem like,

|<--3-->|<--6-->|<--1-->|<--7-->|
A       B       C       D       E

Now as you said, the sum they will give (in random order too) 3,9,10,17,6,7,14,1,8,7.

But you could take any combination (mostly it will be wrong ),

6-3-1-7. (say this is our taken combination)
Now,

6+3 -> 9 There, so Yes    //Checking in the list whether the 2 numbers could possibly be adjacent.
3+1 -> 4 NOT THERE, so cannot
1+7 -> 8 There, So Yes
6+7 -> 13 NOT THERE, So cannot be ajacent

Heart concept :

For, 2 numbers to be adjacent, their sum must be there in the list. If the sum is not in the list, then the numbers are not adjacent.

Optimization :

So, 3 and 1 will not come nearby. And 6 and 7 will not come nearby.

Hence while doing permutation, we could eliminate

*31*,*13*,*76* and *67* combinations. Where * is 0 or more no of digits either preceding or succeeding.

i.e instead of trying permutation for 4! = 24 times, we could only check for 3617,1637,3716,1736. ie only 4 times. i.e 84% of computation is saved.

Worst case :

Say in your case it is 5,2,3. Now, we have to perform this operation.

5+2 -> 7 There
2+3 -> 5 There
5+3 -> 8 There

Oops, your example is worst case, where we could not optimize the solution in these type of cases.

share|improve this answer
    
You can't just take n smallest elements. For example, for 1-1-3, you would get 1-1-2. –  svick Jun 17 '13 at 19:19
    
@svick oh! ya. I dint notice that. But once we found the numbers, my partial solution seems to work –  EAGER_STUDENT Jun 17 '13 at 19:23
    
@Downvoter whats wrong there? or Am I missing anything? –  EAGER_STUDENT Jun 17 '13 at 19:24
    
So, how would you find the numbers? –  svick Jun 17 '13 at 19:28
    
@svick ya I agree. I doesnt have Idea now. But i think , if one comeup with finding numbers, we could apply this. Soon, I try to come with such an idea. –  EAGER_STUDENT Jun 17 '13 at 19:30

Place the milestones one by one

EDIT See new implementation below (with timings).

The key idea is the following:

  1. Build a list of milestones one by one, starting with one milestone at 0 and a milestone at max(distances). Lets call them endpoints.
  2. The largest distance that's not accounted for has to be from one of the endpoints, which leaves at most two positions for the corresponding milestone.

The following Python program simply checks if the milestone can be placed from the left endpoint, and if not, tries to place the milestone from the right endpoint (always using the largest distances that's not accounted for by the already placed milestones). This has to be done with back-tracking, as placements may turn out wrong later.

Note that there is another (mirrored) solution that is not output. (I don't think there can be more than 2 solutions (symmetric), but I haven't proven it.)

I consider the position of the milestones as the solution and use a helper function steps for the output desired by the OP.

from collections import Counter

def milestones_from_dists(dists, milestones=None):
    if not dists: # all dist are acounted for: we have a solution!
        return milestones
    if milestones is None:
        milestones = [0]
    max_dist = max(dists)
    solution_from_left = try_milestone(dists, milestones, min(milestones) + max_dist)
    if solution_from_left is not None:
        return solution_from_left
    return try_milestone(dists, milestones, max(milestones) - max_dist)

def try_milestone(dists, milestones, new_milestone):    
    unused_dists = Counter(dists)
    for milestone in milestones:
        dist = abs(milestone - new_milestone)
        if unused_dists[dist]:
            unused_dists[dist] -= 1
            if unused_dists[dist] == 0:
                del unused_dists[dist]
        else:
            return None # no solution
    return milestones_from_dists(unused_dists, milestones + [new_milestone])

def steps(milestones):
    milestones = sorted(milestones)
    return [milestones[i] - milestones[i - 1] for i in range(1, len(milestones))]

Example usage:

>>> print(steps(milestones_from_dists([7, 10, 5, 2, 8, 3])))
[3, 5, 2]
>>> import random
>>> milestones = random.sample(range(1000), 100)
>>> dists = [abs(x - y) for x in milestones for y in milestones if x < y]
>>> solution = sorted(milestones_from_dists(dists))
>>> solution == sorted(milestones)
True
>>> print(solution)
[0, 10, 16, 23, 33, 63, 72, 89, 97, 108, 131, 146, 152, 153, 156, 159, 171, 188, 210, 211, 212, 215, 219, 234, 248, 249, 273, 320, 325, 329, 339, 357, 363, 387, 394, 396, 402, 408, 412, 418, 426, 463, 469, 472, 473, 485, 506, 515, 517, 533, 536, 549, 586, 613, 614, 615, 622, 625, 630, 634, 640, 649, 651, 653, 671, 674, 697, 698, 711, 715, 720, 730, 731, 733, 747, 758, 770, 772, 773, 776, 777, 778, 783, 784, 789, 809, 828, 832, 833, 855, 861, 873, 891, 894, 918, 952, 953, 968, 977, 979]
>>> print(steps(solution))
[10, 6, 7, 10, 30, 9, 17, 8, 11, 23, 15, 6, 1, 3, 3, 12, 17, 22, 1, 1, 3, 4, 15, 14, 1, 24, 47, 5, 4, 10, 18, 6, 24, 7, 2, 6, 6, 4, 6, 8, 37, 6, 3, 1, 12, 21, 9, 2, 16, 3, 13, 37, 27, 1, 1, 7, 3, 5, 4, 6, 9, 2, 2, 18, 3, 23, 1, 13, 4, 5, 10, 1, 2, 14, 11, 12, 2, 1, 3, 1, 1, 5, 1, 5, 20, 19, 4, 1, 22, 6, 12, 18, 3, 24, 34, 1, 15, 9, 2]

New implementation incorporationg suggestions from the comments

from collections import Counter

def milestones_from_dists(dists):
    dists = Counter(dists)
    right_end = max(dists)
    milestones = [0, right_end]
    del dists[right_end]
    sorted_dists = sorted(dists)
    add_milestones_from_dists(dists, milestones, sorted_dists, right_end)
    return milestones

def add_milestone

s_from_dists(dists, milestones, sorted_dists, right_end):
    if not dists:
        return True # success!
    # find max dist that's not fully used yet
    deleted_dists = [] 
    while not dists[sorted_dists[-1]]:
        deleted_dists.append(sorted_dists[-1])
        del sorted_dists[-1]
    max_dist = sorted_dists[-1]

    # for both possible positions, check if this fits the already placed milestones 
    for new_milestone in [max_dist, right_end - max_dist]:
        used_dists = Counter() # for backing up
        for milestone in milestones:
            dist = abs(milestone - new_milestone)
            if dists[dist]: # this distance is still available
                dists[dist] -= 1
                if dists[dist] == 0: 
                    del dists[dist]
                used_dists[dist] += 1
            else: # no solution
                dists.update(used_dists) # back up
                sorted_dists.extend(reversed(deleted_dists))
                break
        else: # unbroken
            milestones.append(new_milestone) 
            success = add_milestones_from_dists(dists, milestones, sorted_dists, right_end)
            if success:
                return True
            dists.update(used_dists) # back up
            sorted_dists.extend(reversed(deleted_dists))
            del milestones[-1]  
    return False

def steps(milestones):
    milestones = sorted(milestones)
    return [milestones[i] - milestones[i - 1] for i in range(1, len(milestones))]

Timings for random milestones in the range from 0 to 100000:

  • n = 10: 0.00s

  • n = 100: 0.05s

  • n = 1000: 3.20s

  • n = 10000: still takes too long.

share|improve this answer
    
Basically the same idea as what I had, but that code is not exactly easy to follow. It's worth noting that it's a recursively solution - this isn't clear from the explanation. What's the running time for 100 / 1000 / 10000 / etc. points? I think there's quite a lot of room for improvement - from using sorted sets, and it seems you're passing around copies of the collections, which isn't necessary, it should be more efficient to undo any changes made at the end of the function. –  Dukeling Jun 17 '13 at 22:02
    
@Dukeling: What do you you mean by "sorted sets"? –  WolframH Jun 17 '13 at 22:32
    
Both the distances and the milestones can be sorted. Since I'm not quite following your code, it's difficult to tell whether this is a good idea, but if you were to put the distances in a sorted set (getting you 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10 for the example in the question), min and max can be optimized to be constant time operations. –  Dukeling Jun 17 '13 at 22:47
    
I don't know Python and don't have the impulse to do it myself, could either of you give the complexity of this approach? Sounds like brute force to me? –  G. Bach Jun 17 '13 at 22:49
    
@G.Bach The worst-case complexity is possibly as bad as O(2^n), which is why I asked about running times. If it's well implemented, and the input is not pathological, I expect it to backtrack reasonably early whenever it makes an incorrect choice and ultimately achieve a decent running time. –  Dukeling Jun 17 '13 at 23:23

The largest distance in the given set of distance is the distance between the first and the last milestone, i.e. in your example 10. You can find this in O(n) step.

For every other milestone (every one except the first or the last), you can find their distances from the first and the last milestone by looking for a pair of distances that sums up to the maximum distance, i.e. in your example 7+3 = 10, 8+2 = 10. You can find these pairs trivially in O(n^2).

Now if you think the road is from east to west, what remains is that for all the interior milestones (all but the first or the last), you need to know which one of the two distances (e.g. 7 and 3, or 8 and 2) is towards east (the other is then towards west).

You can trivially enumerate all the possibilities in time O(2^(n-2)), and for every possible orientation check that you get the same set of distances as in the problem. This is faster than enumerating through all permutations of the smallest distances in the set.

For example, if you assume 7 and 8 are towards west, then the distance between the two internal milestones is 1 mile, which is not in the problem set. So it must be 7 towards west, 8 towards east, leading to solution (or it's mirror)

WEST | -- 2 -- | -- 5 -- | -- 3 -- | EAST

For a larger set of milestones, you would just start guessing the orientation of the two distances to the endpoints, and whenever you product two milestones that have a distance between them that is not in the problem set, you backtrack.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty sure you'll run into cases where 2 distances sum to the total distance, but these are actually distances between internal points - there are a lot of internal distances. And O(2^(n-2)) is pretty slow. –  Dukeling Jun 18 '13 at 19:57
    
Hmm yes, you're right. –  Antti Huima Jun 19 '13 at 10:15

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