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I have a multithreaded (pthreads) application where I have hooked SIGINT to allow me to interrupt the program. I set up a signal hander thread like so:

    /*** startup code ***/
// Prep signal-related stuff:
signal(SIGPIPE, SIG_IGN);

sigset_t set;
sigemptyset(&set);
sigaddset(&set, SIGINT);
assert(0 == pthread_sigmask(SIG_BLOCK, &set, NULL));

// Spawn signal handling thread
pthread_t sig_pthread;
pthread_create(&sig_pthread, NULL, &sig_thread, (void *) &set);

The signal handler thread is here:

static void* sig_thread(void *arg) {
    sigset_t *set = (sigset_t *) arg;
    int s, sig;

#ifndef __APPLE__
    prctl(PR_SET_NAME, "signal hander", 0, 0, 0);
#endif

    for (;;) {
        s = sigwait(set, &sig);
        if (s != 0) {
            ERR(E_UNKNOWN, "sigwait failed?\n");
            /* ERR is macro -> exit(E_UNKNOWN) */
        }

        if (sig == SIGINT) {
            ...
        } else {
            ERR(E_UNKNOWN, "caught unknown signal %d\n", sig);
            /* ERR is macro -> exit(E_UNKNOWN) */
        }
    }
}

When running normally, the code works as expected. However, if I run the program under gdb, I get:

--- E: caught unknown signal 4611

Does anyone have any insight on the (decimal) value 4611 (0x1203, 01103)? It was not anything obvious in signal.h. Does anyone know what gdb is doing to cause this to happen and how I can fix / prevent it?

share|improve this question
    
The code that contains ` /*** startup code ***/` , does this thread/function/etc. still exist as the sig_thread() thread is running - just to make sure the set variable you hand over to sig_thread() still exists and isn't garbage ? –  nos Jun 18 '13 at 7:53
    
Yes, it lives for the life of the process. –  Pat Jun 19 '13 at 8:32
    
I think it probably isn't anything gdb is doing per se; but rather a kernel and/or libc problem. If I were investigating this I might try watching the kernel behavior here using systemtap. –  Tom Tromey Jun 19 '13 at 16:23
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1 Answer

I suspect the 4611 to be garbage, as you do not initialise sig prior to calling sigwait().

From the sources you show, it seems like you do not skip the test of sig in case of an error (s != 0).

You might like to mod your code like so:

#include <stdio.h>    
#include <signal.h>
...

#define E_UNKNOWN "E"
#define ERR(ec, fmt, ...) (fprintf(stderr, "--- %s: " fmt, (ec), __VA_ARGS__))

...

  for (;;) {
    int sig = 0;
    int s = sigwait(set, &sig);

    if (s != 0) {
        ERR(E_UNKNOWN, "sigwait() failed with %d.\n", s);
    }
    else {
      if (sig == SIGINT) {
          ...
      } else {
        ERR(E_UNKNOWN, "Caught unhandled signal %d.\n", sig);
      }
    }
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
It should never get there however. ERR is a macro that expands to exit() with some pretty-printing. If s != 0 the code will die before reaching the unhandled signal line. I've edited the question to make this slightly clearer. –  Pat Jun 19 '13 at 8:33
    
@Pat: I see. However, you do yourself a favour initialising sig prior to calling sigwait(), because you will then see whether sigwat() set the 4611 or not. –  alk Jun 19 '13 at 9:50
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