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Basically I need to download a txt file that updates and changes names each day and open it in Excel. My problem is that I'm doing this for a MAC and I can't find the necessary modules for VBA (as far as I can tell)

So I've resorted to writing a PERL script to actually download the file, and then I'll just make a VBA script to open the newest file. I've successfully used the net:ftp module to actually download the file, what would be the best way to search by date and only download the newest file? Additionally, would fetch be the better option? the ftp site doesn't require credentials.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use Net::FTP;
use strict;
use warnings;

my $ftp = Net::FTP->new("ftp.site", Debug => 0)
 or die;

$ftp->login("anonymous",'-anonymous')
 or die, $ftp->message;

$ftp->cwd("/public/doc/cor/")
 or die;

$ftp->get("20130614c.txt")
 or die , $ftp->message;

$ftp->quit;
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FTP usually does not send the file timestamp; what is the name scheme for the files? –  Massa Jun 17 '13 at 20:19
    
It's based on date. Today's is going to be 20130617c.txt, increasing each day. The c just stands for some data type and shouldn't change. –  user2361820 Jun 17 '13 at 20:21

2 Answers 2

As your file names are date-based, you can just do:

$ftp->get( [sort($ftp->ls)]->[-1] )

since that would be your newest file...

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Swapping that $ftp->get with my previous one for the exact file name caused the script to die at that line. Any idea why? –  user2361820 Jun 17 '13 at 20:42
    
put say for sort($ftp->ls); before that line and see if the filenames are coming in the right order... –  Massa Jun 17 '13 at 23:39

If you can always check for the name according to the current day then just create a formatted string of today's date:

my($sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $mon, $year) = localtime(time);
$year += 1900;
$mon += 1;

my $today = sprintf("%04d%02d%02d", $year, $mon, $mday);

Now you have the file name according to your conventions:

$ftp->get("${today}c.txt")

If you need a date other than current date, then you can use a date math library to calculate the date you need and format it accordingly. I personally always use Date::Calc.

And of course, make sure to handle the error gracefully if the file doesn't exist on the ftp host yet.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this but there's going to be a lot of instances where the file won't be added yet and I'd had to add a bunch of clauses for weekends, etc (it only gets posted on weekdays). If I can't find a more basic solution, such as getting Massa's to work, I'll definitely go that route. –  user2361820 Jun 17 '13 at 20:59

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