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I need to turn a string like data = "00000111010110101" into a hex string, in this example I need '075A80'

You may notice a few caveats:

  • leading zeros should not be stripped so hex(int(data,2)) doesn't work for me
  • if len(data) %8 != 0 the string should be appended with zeros to end with a full byte

After searching this forum and hacking together different answers, this is one way I found to do it, but it seems rather complex and I hope someone else sees a much simpler way.

data_hex = "".join([ "%02X" % int("".join(a),2) for a in izip_longest(*(iter(data),)*8, fillvalue='0')])

Thanks!

Edit: Some background on the data. The underlying data is purely bits, it does not represent an integer or other numeric value, so the leading zeros are relevant and must be represented in the result. Also appending zeros at the (right) end doesn't change the "value" in my use case.

share|improve this question
    
Also, I can only use Python 2.7. – DozyBrat Jun 17 '13 at 20:18
    
00000111010110101 bin is eb5 hex so I'm not really sure how you get 075A80. – Juhana Jun 17 '13 at 20:22
    
0x075A80 is 1110101101010000000 in binary. Looks like you're missing some zeroes on the right hand side. – Kevin Jun 17 '13 at 20:23
    
From the question "if len(data) %8 != 0 the string should be appended with zeros to end with a full byte" – Andrew Clark Jun 17 '13 at 20:25
2  
Yes, but typically "end" means "left hand side" in this context. If you append to the right, then the value of the number will change, which is a very unusual thing to do when you're just trying to display something. – Kevin Jun 17 '13 at 20:27
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is one option:

>>> data = "00000111010110101"
>>> new_data = data + '0' * ((8 - len(data)) % 8)
>>> '{0:0{width}x}'.format(int(new_data, 2), width=len(new_data) / 4)
'075a80'

The first line appends zeros so the length is a multiple of 8, and the second formats your hex string.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this answer, I wanted to avoid any conditionals. I also wanted to avoid any pre-formatting but I think caveat #2 sort of demands it. Also this answer cleanly deals with any size input, with the width in the format string. Thanks. – DozyBrat Jun 17 '13 at 21:01
    
Any reason the % 8 is performed on (8 - len(data)), instead of just (len(data) - 1) ? – DozyBrat Jun 17 '13 at 23:45
    
(len(data) - 1) % 8 would give you the wrong number of zeroes needed... – Andrew Clark Jun 17 '13 at 23:58

0-pad your input to a multiple of 8, then turn it into a hex value:

multiple, remainder = divmod(len(data), 8)
if remainder:
    data = format(data, '<0{}'.format((multiple + 1) * 8))
result = format(int(data, 2), '0{}x'.format((multiple + 1) * 2))

The output is padded as well to give 2 hex characters per full byte.

This gives:

>>> data = "00000111010110101"
>>> multiple, remainder = divmod(len(data), 8)
>>> if remainder:
...     data = format(data, '<0{}'.format((multiple + 1) * 8))
... 
>>> format(int(data, 2), '0{}x'.format((multiple + 1) * 2))
'075a80'
share|improve this answer

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