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l - adiacency list
x - starting vertex
dfst, q - empty array of vertex size

std::list <int> q;
std::vector<bool> visited(cols + 1); 
for(int i = 0; i < cols; i++) visited[i] = false;
visited[x] = true;
if(!l[x].empty())
for(std::list<int>::iterator i = l[x].begin(); i != l[x].end(); i++)
{
    q.push_back(x); q.push_back(* i);
}
while(!q.empty())
{
    y = q.back(); q.pop_back();
    x = q.back(); q.pop_back();
    if(!visited[y])
    {
        visited[y] = true;
        if(!l[y].empty())
        for(std::list<int>::iterator i = l[y].begin(); i != l[y].end(); i++)
        {
            q.push_back(y); q.push_back(* i);
        }
        dfst[x].push_back(y);
        dfst[y].push_back(x);
    }
}

I just can't see why does this give wrong results...I don't know if you are familiar with this algorithm, but if you are, I hope you can see what's wrong here.

EDIT:

Adjacency list is:
1: 2, 3
2: 3
3: 4
4: 3

MST should here be something like:
1: 2, 3
3: 4

But instead it's:
2: 3
3: 2, 4
4: 3

And the current code is: (I used brackets where it was needed):

std::list <int> q;
std::vector<bool> visited(cols + 1); 
for(int i = 0; i < cols; i++) visited[i] = false;
visited[x] = true;
if(!l[x].empty())
{
    for(std::list<int>::iterator i = l[x].begin(); i != l[x].end(); i++)
    {
        q.push_back(x); q.push_back(* i);
    }
    while(!q.empty())
    {
        y = q.back(); q.pop_back();
        x = q.back(); q.pop_back();
        if(!visited[y])
        {
            visited[y] = true;
            if(!l[y].empty())
            for(std::list<int>::iterator i = l[y].begin(); i != l[y].end(); i++)
            {
                if(!visited[*i])
                {q.push_back(y); q.push_back(* i);}
            }
            dfst[x].push_back(y);
            dfst[y].push_back(x);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
use brackets to order your code. I doubt that the if statement does what you mean it to do. –  Yochai Timmer Jun 17 '13 at 20:24
1  
Would a minimal complete example and a more explicit description of "wrong results" be too much to ask? –  Beta Jun 17 '13 at 20:25
    
Ok, I wrote some sample data, and refactored the code a bit. –  user2489034 Jun 17 '13 at 20:46
    
I just saw this, and edited the output - but that's just more strange now. –  user2489034 Jun 17 '13 at 20:49
    
4, as there are 4 vertices. –  user2489034 Jun 17 '13 at 20:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I worked through your code, it appears to be correct. However, keep in mind that there are multiple DFS trees if your input tree has a cycle. The tree that you get depends on the order in which you process your vertices. Perhaps your input has a cycle? If so, your code might be processing the nodes in an order different from the order that they are processed in the solution.

For example, take the following adjacency list for an input tree, where nodes are lettered:

a: b,c
b: a,d
c: a,c,e
d: b,c,e
e: c,d

Starting at a, if we look in the adjacency list for the next node based on alphabetical order, we get the following DFS tree:

a: b
b: a,d
c: d,e
d: b,d
e: c

Using your algorithm though, we get the following:

a: c
b: d
c: a,e
d: b,e
e: c,d

If this is happening, perhaps try a recursive approach.

Seeing some sample input and output would help further with ansering this question though, as this may not be your problem.

EDIT: I should clarify that the multiple DFS trees in a graph with a cycle applies where the cycle is bidirectional, such as with an undirected graph. The point is, you might be finding a DFS tree that is also correct, but not the same as the one that has been identified as correct.

EDIT (again): Another issue you may have: your algorithm appears to be for undirected graphs since you have the satements dfst[x].push_back(y); dfst[y].push_back(x);in your code, but your input graph given in your example looks like it's directed. Removing the second statement (dfst[y].push_back(x);) should correct this

share|improve this answer
    
@user2489034 Have you found a solution yet? Just checking up –  wlyles Jun 17 '13 at 22:26
    
I lost hope until I saw your second edit - removing that second line worked :D Thanks! –  user2489034 Jun 18 '13 at 20:38

Code looks little confusing actually i thought its BFS first..but its DFS You should check if the node is visited before adding to the stack(back of list)

while(!q.empty())
{
    y = q.back(); q.pop_back();
    x = q.back(); q.pop_back();
    if(!visited[y])
    {
        visited[y] = true;
        if(!l[y].empty())
        for(std::list<int>::iterator i = l[y].begin(); i != l[y].end(); i++)
        {
            if(!visited[*i])
            {q.push_back(y); q.push_back(* i);}
        }
        dfst[x].push_back(y);
        dfst[y].push_back(x);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That should be if (!visited[*i]) inside the for-loop. But that wouldn't change the result, only make it more efficient. –  Daniel Fischer Jun 17 '13 at 20:39

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