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There are many functions within the code I am maintaining which have what could be described as boilerplate heavy. Here is the boilerplate pattern which is repeated ad nausea throughout the application when handling DB I/O with a cursor:

if( !RowValue( row, m_InferredTable->YearColumn(), m_InferredTable->YearName(), m_InferredTable->TableName(), value )
		|| !IsValidValue( value ) )
	{
		GetNextRow( cursor, m_InferredTable );

		continue;
	}
	else
	{
		value.ChangeType(VT_INT);
		element.SetYear( value.intVal );
	}

The thing is not all of these statements like this deal with ints, this "element" object, the "year" column, etc. I've been asked to look at condensing it even further than it already is and I can't think of a way to do it. I keep tripping over the continue statement and the accessors of the various classes.

Edit: Thanks to all those that commented. This is why I love this site. Here is an expanded view:

while( row != NULL )
{
	Element element;
	value.ClearToZero();
	if( !GetRowValue( row, m_InferredTable->DayColumn(), m_InferredTable->DayName(), m_InferredTable->TableName(), value )
		|| !IsValidValue( value ) )
	{
		GetNextRow( cursor, m_InferredTable );

		continue;
	}
	else
	{
		value.ChangeType(VT_INT);
		element.SetDay( value.intVal );
	}

And things continue onward like this. Not all values taken from a "row" are ints. The last clause in the while loop is "GetNextRow."

share|improve this question
    
Can you post more than one example then, so we can see what is fixed and what changes more easily? –  tragomaskhalos Nov 11 '09 at 15:02
    
We need to see a little more of the structure... this is obviously one clause within a loop, but how many such clauses are there in a single loop? Is each test (if) different? –  Jim Garrison Nov 11 '09 at 15:04
    
In its current form it is hard to make sense of the question. Why is there an else branch if true branch ended with a continue? Is there something else after the if inside the cycle? And where's the cycle, BTW? –  AndreyT Nov 11 '09 at 15:07
1  
I think to give intelligent advice, we're probably going to need to see just a bit more of the code -- the whole while loop would be a reasonable starting point. –  Jerry Coffin Nov 11 '09 at 15:07
    
Surely, this is an infinite loop, if the test fails, it never advances the current row thus testing the same row next time. I take it, therefore, that there is quite a bit of other stuff in there. –  Skizz Nov 11 '09 at 15:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Okay, from what you've said, you have a structure something like this:

while (row!=NULL)  {
    if (!x) {
        GetNextRow();
        continue;
   }
   else {
       SetType(someType);
       SetValue(someValue);
   }
   if (!y) {
       GetNextRow();
       continue;
   }
   else {
       SetType(SomeOtherType);
       SetValue(someOtherValue);
   }
// ...

   GetNextRow();   
}

If that really is correct, I'd get rid of all the GetNextRow calls except for the last one. I'd then structure the code something like:

while (row != NULL) {
    if (x) {
        SetType(someType);
        SetValue(someValue);
    }
    else if (y) {
        SetType(someOtherType);
        SetValue(SomeOtherValue);
    }
    // ...
    GetNextRow();
}

Edit: Another possibility would be to write your code as a for loop:

for (;row!=NULL;GetNextRow()) {
    if (!x) 
        continue;
    SetTypeAndValue();
    if (!y)
        continue;
    SetTypeandValue();
    // ...

Since the call to GetNextRow is now part of the loop itself, we don't have to (explicitly) call it each time -- the loop itself will take care of that. The next step (if you have enough of these to make it worthwhile) would be to work on shortening the code to set the types and values. One possibility would be to use template specialization:

// We never use the base template -- it just throws to indicate a problem.
template <class T>
SetValue(T const &value) { 
   throw(something);
}

// Then we provide a template specialization for each type we really use:
template <>
SetValue<int>(int value) {
    SetType(VT_INT);
    SetValue(value);
}

template <>
SetValue<float>(float value) { 
    SetType(VT_FLOAT);
    SetValue(value);
}

This lets you combine a pair of calls to set the type and the value into a single call.

Edit: As far as cutting processing short goes, it depends -- if parsing a column is expensive (enough to care about) you can simply nest your conditions:

if (x) { 
    SetTypeAndValue();
    if (y) {
        SetTypeAndValue();
        if (z) { 
            SetTypeAndValue();

and so on. The major shortcoming of this is that it'll get pretty deeply nested if (as you've said) you have 20+ conditions in a single loop. That being the case, I'd probably think hard about the for-loop based version I gave above.

share|improve this answer
    
So just say if one of my columns returns an invalid value just keep parsing all the column values, discard the row's entries at the end, and then proceed on to the next row? Thanks. –  wheaties Nov 11 '09 at 15:40

Why not make a function to do all the work?

bool processElement(Element& element, Row* row, int value, Table& m_InferredTable, /*other params*/)
{
    if( !GetRowValue( row, m_InferredTable->DayColumn(), m_InferredTable->DayName(), m_InferredTable->TableName(), value )
            || !IsValidValue( value ) )
    {
            GetNextRow( cursor, m_InferredTable );
            return true;
    }
    else
    {
            value.ChangeType(VT_INT);
            element.SetDay( value.intVal );
    }
    return false;
}

In your loop

while (row != NULL)
{
    if (processElement(element, row, value, m_InferredTable))
        continue;
    // other code
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd need to make a function for each different value I wanted, wouldn't I? Not all values are ints. There are Day, year, hour, plus 24 other types. Damn I miss reflection. –  wheaties Nov 11 '09 at 15:44
    
You could make it a template function for handling all types... –  Inverse Nov 11 '09 at 16:02
    
@Inverse: Each type probably has it's own unique code in the 'else' clause so a template might not help here. Function pointers perhaps? –  Skizz Nov 11 '09 at 16:49

Why not invert your if-test?

   if (RowValue(row, m_InferredTable->YearColumn(), m_InferredTable->YearName(),  m_InferredTable->TableName(), value ) 
     && IsValidValue( value ))
   {
     value.ChangeType(VT_INT);
     element.SetYear( value.intVal );
   }
   else
   {
     GetNextRow( cursor, m_InferredTable );
   }
share|improve this answer
    
You're missing the continue statement. That's the big hangup here - how to get boilerplate code to continue the loop. –  mskfisher Nov 11 '09 at 15:04
    
The need for 'continue' implies that this is one of many clauses in the loop. We're still waiting for confirmation from the OP, but it smells like a big case statement implemented with continue. –  Jim Garrison Nov 11 '09 at 15:08
    
I hope this isn't a big case statement. However, yes, the continue is what kills it. If the value taken from one of the columns is invalid then the continue causes the loops to go to the next row from the query. –  wheaties Nov 11 '09 at 15:27
    
I assumed there was an enclosing loop, so the continue would not be necessary unless there was more code... Moot point, since the the OP has clarified the question. –  Jeff Paquette Nov 11 '09 at 15:47

My instinctual approach is to build a polymorphic approach here, where you eventually wind up doing something like(modulo your language and exact logic):

db_cursor cursor;

while(cursor.valid())
{
  if(cursor.data.valid())
  { 
     process();
  }

  cursor.next();
}

db_cursor would be a base class that your different table type classes inherit from, and the child classes would implement the validity functions.

share|improve this answer
    
What if the cursor and row objects were from a third party API? –  wheaties Nov 11 '09 at 15:22
    
wrap them up in objects of my own to implement a common interface. It'll be messy, and you'll have to watch out for diamond inheritance problems(depending), but it'll be cleaner in the long run. –  Paul Nathan Nov 11 '09 at 15:31

Move it into a template function, templated on the element type (e.g. integer), which you can call over and over. Vary the behavior per data type with a trait template.

template <typename T> struct ElemTrait<T> {};
template <> struct ElemTrait<int> {
    static inline void set(Val &value, Elem &element) {
    	value.ChangeType(VT_INT);
    	element.SetYear(value.intVal);
    }
};
// template <> struct ElemTrait<float> { ... };

template <typename T>
void do_stuff( ... ) {
    // ...

    if (!RowValue(row,
        m_InferredTable->YearColumn(),
        m_InferredTable->YearName(),
        m_InferredTable->TableName(), value)
        || !IsValidValue(value)
    ) {
        GetNextRow(cursor, m_InferredTable);
        continue;
    } else {
        ElemTrait<T>::set(value, element);
    }

    // ...
}
share|improve this answer

You can take out all the GetNextRow calls and the else clauses:

for (row = GetFirstRow () ; row != null ; GetNextRow ())
{
    Element element;
    value.ClearToZero();
    if( !GetRowValue( row, m_InferredTable->DayColumn(), m_MetInferredOutTable->DayName(), m_MetInferredOutTable->TableName(), value )
            || !IsValidValue( value ) )
    {
      continue;
    }

    value.ChangeType(VT_INT);
    element.SetDay( value.intVal );
}
share|improve this answer

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