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I'm working on a service that connects to a REST service, gets a response, transforms it and writes it to a database. I was originally using a flat file in my proof of concept, and everything worked fine. Now, after 10-15 requests, the script would just hang. I was getting all 30 requests to work on the flat file, and only a third to half as many on the database.

I set out to write a test case that would isolate what was going on, and found that after I had stripped out all of my actual application logic, database schema, and request information, I got down to something like this:

var mysql = require('mysql');
var pool  = mysql.createPool({
  host     : 'localhost',
  user     : 'user',
  password : 'secret',
});

while (true) {
        pool.getConnection(function (err, connection) {
            if (err) throw err;
            connection.query('SELECT 1 + 1 AS solution', function(err, rows, fields) {
              if (err) throw err;
              console.log('The solution is: ', rows[0].solution);
              connection.end();
            });
        });
}

As far as I can imagine, this is the minimal amount of code to do something using a connection pool. When run, nothing is ever logged to the command line. Remove the while {} block, and it runs once as expected and then exits.

My expectation was that the pool size would provide the constraint, and while it would be querying mysql quite quickly, it wouldn't ever grow over a certain size. Instead, it seems to never attempt to make a connection.


Edits based on Daniel's comment about the async library and when to call connection.end(). I follow the logic behind what the async library is achieving here, and that you should release the resource as early as possible, but something is still blocking. The prints the result of the query to the console once, and then "hangs".

var mysql = require('mysql'),
    async = require('async');
var pool = mysql.createPool({
  host     : 'localhost',
  user     : 'user',
  password : 'secret',
});



async.forever(function() {
                        pool.getConnection(function (err, connection) {
                            if(err) throw err;
                            connection.query('SELECT 1 + 1 AS solution', 
                              function(err, rows, fields) {
                              connection.end();
                              if (err) throw err;
                              console.log('The solution is: ', rows[0].solution);
                            });

                        });
            },
            function (err) {
                console.log(err);
            });

I'm not comfortable being stuck this way - it seems like either async or mysql is breaking the promise of being asynchronous... any thoughts?

share|improve this question

You're using a synchronous loop to deploy an asynchronous resource. You can't do that.

Your while loop fills up the database pool and then loops once again and blocks on getConnection which then blocks the whole Node.js event loop.

You can use the async package to perform asynchronous while loops.

The async#forever call would do what you're trying to achieve.


Also, your code is leaking database connections. You should put the connection.end() first in the callback unless you're going to use the same connection again. Otherwise, an error will leak a database connection.

pool.getConnection(function (err, connection) {
    if (err) throw err;
    connection.query('SELECT 1 + 1 AS solution', function(err, rows, fields) {
      connection.end(); // return to pool before evaluating error.
      if (err) throw err;
      console.log('The solution is: ', rows[0].solution);
    });
});
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found what I was doing wrong with async.forever , thanks to this excellent article about the practical use of the async library: http://www.sebastianseilund.com/nodejs-async-in-practice

The key is understanding how async uses its special callback functions. It needs to be passed to the inner-most nested asynchronous function as it's callback parameter, so that function can pass control back to async. Here's the script I revised based on Daniel's feedback from above, corrected to use the library properly (and it functions as expected):

var mysql = require('mysql'),
    async = require('async');
var pool = mysql.createPool({
    host     : 'localhost',
    user     : 'user',
    password : 'secret', 
});



async.forever(function(callback) {
    pool.getConnection(function (err, connection) {
        if(err) throw err;
            connection.query('SELECT 1 + 1 AS solution', 
                function(err, rows, fields) {
                    connection.end(callback);
                    if (err) throw err;
                    console.log('The solution is: ', rows[0].solution);
                });
        });  
    },
    function (err) {
        console.log(err);  
    });
share|improve this answer

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