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I'm trying to pass the context in which an exception was raised to an Exception subclass, in order to use this context to generate an informative error message. I recognize that I could pass individual pieces of data to the Exception, but I am wondering how I can pass and use the whole context.

I know I can capture the context with Kernel#binding. The Ruby 2.0 docs for class Binding list a single method: eval. This allows you to evaluate a String in the context captured by a Binding. I am wondering whether it is possible to evaluate a block in the context of a binding. I would use this as follows:

class MyError < StandardError

  def initialize(str: nil, context: nil)
    @str = str; @context = context
    super(str)
  end

  def to_s
    @str ? @str : @context.**SOME_METHOD** { "Error: x == #{x}" }
  end

end 

x = 5
raise MyError.new(context: binding)

=> Error: x == #{5}

I've tried both instance_exec and instance_eval, for SOME_METHOD, neither of which work. Is there any way to do this? Or, is there some reason that it is a bad idea to generate the error message from the whole context, rather than individual pieces of data from the environment?

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1 Answer 1

Use eval(string, binding) to run Ruby code with given variable bindings. For your case, you can rewrite to_s method as followed:

def to_s
  @str ? @str : eval('"Error: x == #{x}"', @context)
end

Note that you'll need '"some_string"' form to prevent string interpolation before the parameter is passed to eval.

If you want to evaluate block with some binding, you'll have to assign the block to a variable and eval the block like block.call. Now you have two binding environments, one for the variable block and another for the variables in the block. As there's no method such as join, combine for Binding, it seems that you cannot achieve this with Kernel#eval or Binding#eval. And besides, a block captures its bindings where it was defined. When you call eval('block.call', some_binding), it ignores the binding passed in.

However, you can use Object#instance_eval and pass the block in with the form instance_eval(&block), that will evaluate the block in the bindings of the Class's instance methods. So you can create proper bindings for the block with the context you captured.

class BlockEnv
  def initialize(context, &block)
    # remove instance methods inherited from Object to minimize the impact
    # remove this if unnecessary
    BlockEnv.instance_methods
      .reject{|m|
        [:object_id, :call, :instance_eval, :method_missing].include?(m) ||
          m.to_s !~ /^[a-z]\w*$/i }
      .each do |m|
        eval("undef :#{m}")
      end
    @context = context
    @block = block
  end
  def call
    self.instance_eval(&@block)
  end
  def method_missing(name)
    eval(name.to_s, @context) rescue super
  end
end

class MyError < StandardError
  def initialize(str: nil, context: nil)
    @str = str; @context = context
    super(str)
  end

  def to_s
    @str ? @str : BlockEnv.new(@context){ "Error: x == #{x}" }.call
  end
end

x = 5
raise MyError.new(context: binding)
share|improve this answer
    
very cool, I will use this. It's very strange to me though that there is no more direct way to do this. –  Sean Mackesey Jun 18 '13 at 2:30

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