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I have a strange problem. I am trying to render the following valid latex,

$$\int_{x=0}^{x=h} u_t dx = \int_{x=0}^{x=h} (-au + du_x)_x dx + 
  \int_{x=0}^{x=h} s(x,t,u) dx$$

in a markdown cell in an ipython notebook (version 0.13.2 built from source). If I instead render each term separately it works!

$$\int_{x=0}^{x=h} u_t dx $$

$$\int_{x=0}^{x=h} (-au + du_x)_x dx$$

$$+ \int_{x=0}^{x=h} s(x,t,u) dx$$

Is it possible to get an error message to find out where the problem is? iPython is rendering this via MathJax.

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I think an error message must be possible, because one shows up warning you about rendering latex with MathJax if you open a notebook with out an internet connection. It might be a good place to start looking. –  agconti Jun 18 '13 at 1:03
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look in the javascript console, if there is an error in mathjax it might show up there. Note that on dev-master this renders correctly, and display the raw tex equation if there is an error. –  Matt Jun 18 '13 at 7:11
    
Hmmm interesting. Thank you for checking. In that case maybe there is something strange with either the notebook or my installation? If you are interested here I've dump the .ipynb file to gist.github.com/danieljfarrell/5804708 (it has some graphics that won't load, other than that it my notes on solving partial differential equations! Lots of LaTeX and Sympy) –  boyfarrell Jun 18 '13 at 11:48

1 Answer 1

If you can modify the configuration used by MathJax, you could add

TeX: { noErrors: { disabled: true } }

to the configuration and that should allows the errors to be shown (rather than the original TeX code). If you don't have access to the configuration directly, you could open the browser console window and type

MathJax.Hub.Config({TeX: {noErrors: {disabled: true}})

(and press RETURN) and then execute the cell with the troublesome LaTeX to get the same effect.

I'm wondering of some strange character hasn't gotten into the longer expression (like a forced line break or something).

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