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I am trying to make a little wrapper class such as

template <typename T>
class EdgeTriggeredState

{

public:
    void Tick()
    {
        oldData = newData;
    }

    EdgeTriggeredState& operator =(const T& v)
    {
        newData = v;
        return *this;
    }

//  T& operator = (void)
//  {
//      return oldData;
//  }

//  T& operator T()
//  {
//      return oldData;
//  }

private:
    T oldData;
    T newData;
};

Basically I want to be able to directly assign to a variable of type T the value wrapped by the class. I have tried implementing both an assignment (to type T) operator and a cast operator to type T. I am a bit rusty on my C++ as I have been working solely in C. Is there a way to go about implementing this without creating a named getter method?

When I uncomment the first implementation attempt I get error

"../EdgeTriggeredState.h:19:21: error: ‘T& EdgeTriggeredState::operator=()’ must take exactly one argument"

When I uncomment the second implementation (and comment out the first) I get error:

"../EdgeTriggeredState.h:24:16: error: return type specified for ‘operator T’"

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What's the problem? Have there been any errors on what you have previously tried? If so, what are the errors? Also, could you please post the actual code of your cast operator? –  Mark Garcia Jun 18 '13 at 2:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

When you write an operator T, the return type is implicit, so your code should look something like:

template <typename T>
class DumbWrapper {
    T oldData;
    T newData;
public:
    DumbWrapper& operator = (const T& val) {
        newData = val;
        return *this;
    }

    operator T() {
        return oldData;
    }
};

[Also note the semicolon at the end, and the fact that the constructor and conversion operator were probably intended to be public.]

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1  
Your assignment operator is missing a return (also, +1). –  Jamin Grey Jun 18 '13 at 2:35
    
Thanks this was a case of me asking too soon and not paying enough attention to the error messages. I figured it out when adding more detail to the question. Thanks. –  Gerald Stephan Runion II Jun 18 '13 at 2:36
    
@JaminGrey: Oops -- didn't look closely enough at that before copying from the question. Thanks. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 18 '13 at 2:37
    
Yeah the makeshift code I through up that wasn't actually my problem code had some errors in it that were not in the real code. –  Gerald Stephan Runion II Jun 18 '13 at 2:38

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