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Option 1:

<script>
function Gadget(name, color) { 
   this.name = name; 
   this.color = color; 
   this.whatAreYou = function(){ 
     return 'I am a ' + this.color + ' ' + this.name; 
   }
}
var user = new Gadget('David', 'White');
console.log(user.whatAreYou());
</script>

Option 2:

<script>
function Gadget(name, color) { 
   this.name = name; 
   this.color = color;  

}
Gadget.prototype = {
    whatAreYou: function(){ 
     return 'I am a ' + this.color + ' ' + this.name; 
   }
}
var user = new Gadget('David', 'White');
console.log(user.whatAreYou());
</script>

Question:

Option 1, I put method into function(); Option 2, I added method through prototype, Both of them work. But is there any differnce in these two options when create objects?

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marked as duplicate by Andrew Marshall, elclanrs, bfavaretto, Ian, Achrome Jun 18 '13 at 8:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With Option 1, if you create 100 Gadgets, 100 whatAreYou functions are created for each object in memory.

With Option 2, if you create 100 Gadgets, only 1 whatAreYou function exists in memory, with each Gadget having a link to that function through the Gadget's prototype

Basically using prototype is more memory efficient.

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The prototype is JavaScript's form of object oriented code. It associates the method with all instances of Gadget.

Option1 will just add the method to a single instance, so other instances of gadget will not see it. Instead there will exist a local copy of the method in all instances which means you will experience the creation overhead and memory footprint n times

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you won't really have a footprint of n because the JS engine is allowed to recycle identical functions internally. Maybe IE7 is that lame, but nothing recent would be so naive... –  dandavis Jun 18 '13 at 4:30
    
Probably true, but it's still at the mercy of the browser vendor... It's a bit like compiler optimization in C# etc :-) –  TGH Jun 18 '13 at 4:33

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