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I am interested in calling an instance method as both a class method as well as an instance method. This can be done by using the class_or_instance decorator as follows:

class class_or_instance(object):
    def __init__(self, fn):
        self.fn = fn

    def __get__(self, obj, cls):
        if obj is not None:
            return lambda *args, **kwds: self.fn(obj, *args, **kwds)
        else:
            return lambda *args, **kwds: self.fn(cls, *args, **kwds)

class A(object):
    @class_or_instance
    def func1(self,*args):
         # method body

Now I can call func1 either asA.func1(*args) or A().func1(*args). However when doing this the docstring of func1 disappears. One way to deal with this would be to use decorator from decorator.py but I am having trouble getting this to work with a decorator that is a class rather than a function. Any suggestions on how to go about this?

EDIT : functools.wraps() won't work correctly in this case. See related question on stackoverflow

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Why not use @classmethod or @staticmethod? –  Ulrich Eckhardt Jun 18 '13 at 4:03
    
@classmethod will only allow it to behave as a class method. I want to be able to call it either as a class or as an instance method –  rk7 Jun 18 '13 at 5:00
    
If you call a classmethod on an instance, the first parameter is not a reference to the instance ("self") but to its class ("cls"). The only difference to a staticmethod is that this first "cls" parameter is missing, but otherwise they behave the same. –  Ulrich Eckhardt Jun 18 '13 at 19:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Basic Descriptor/Decorator

You just need to keep in mind which function you should decorate. Your function is being created in __get__, so it won't help to use the wrapper as a decorator, instead, you need to apply it in the __get__ method. As an aside, you can use either functools.update_wrapper or decorators.decorator for this. They work very similarly, except that you have to keep the result of decorators.decorator whereas functools.update_wrapper returns None. Both have signature f(wrapper, wrapped).

from functools import update_wrapper
class class_or_instance(object):
    def __init__(self, fn):
        self.fn = fn

    def __get__(self, obj, cls):
        if obj is not None:
            f = lambda *args, **kwds: self.fn(obj, *args, **kwds)
        else:
            f = lambda *args, **kwds: self.fn(cls, *args, **kwds)
        # update the function to have the correct metadata
        update_wrapper(f, self.fn)
        return f

class A(object):
    @class_or_instance
    def func1(self,*args):
        """some docstring"""
        pass

Now if you do:

print A.func1.__doc__

You'll see "some docstring". Yay!


Cached property decorator

The key here is that you can only affect what gets returned. Since class_or_instance doesn't actually serve as the function, it doesn't really matter what you do with it. Keep in mind that this method causes the function to be rebound every time. I suggest you add a little bit of magic instead and bind/cache the function after the first call, which really just involves adding a setattr call.

from functools import update_wrapper
import types

class class_or_instance(object):
    # having optional func in case is passed something that doesn't have a correct __name__
    # (like a lambda function)
    def __init__(self, name_or_func):
        self.fn = fn
        self.name = fn.__name__

    def __get__(self, obj, cls):
        print "GET!!!"
        if obj is not None:
            f = lambda *args, **kwds: self.fn(obj, *args, **kwds)
            update_wrapper(f, self.fn)
            setattr(obj, self.name, types.MethodType(f, obj, obj.__class__))
        else:
            f = lambda *args, **kwds: self.fn(cls, *args, **kwds)
            update_wrapper(f, self.fn)
        return f

And then we can test it out...neato:

A.func1 #GET!!!
obj = A()
obj.func1 #GET!!!
obj.func1 is obj.func1 # True
A.func1 # GET!!!
obj2 = A()
obj2.func1 is not obj.fun1 # True + GET!!!
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks both the techniques you suggested do correctly return the docstrings. However using decorator.decorator has an issue with the number of arguments passed to the decorated method, and when the method is called it complains of TypeError. On the other hand the update_wrapper technique works without a hitch. I am wondering what's the issue with the first technique? –  rk7 Jun 18 '13 at 13:19
    
@rk7 so decorators.decorator and functools.update_wrapper are not setup to be compatible with each other. I don't think you can use decorators.decorator because it's not set up to handle methods (that have self as the first argument)...it'd take a lot of hacking around to do it...not sure it's worth it. –  Jeff Tratner Jun 20 '13 at 3:21

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