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I am trying to read a pdf file with the following contain:

%PDF-1.4\n%âãÏÓ

If I read it with open, it works but if I try with codecs.open(filename, encoding="utf8", mode="rb") to get a unicode string, I got the following exception:

UnicodeDecodeError: 'utf8' codec can't decode byte 0xe2 in position 10: invalid continuation byte

Do you know a way to get a unicode string from the content of this file?

PS: I am using python 2.7

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

PDFs are made of binary data, not text. They cannot be meaningfully represented as Unicode strings.

For what it's worth, you can get a Unicode string containing those particular characters by treating the PDF as ISO8859-1 text:

f = codecs.open(filename, encoding="ISO8859-1", mode="rb")

But at that point, you're better off just using normal open and reading bytes. Unicode is for text, not data.

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what I don't understand is why you can open it with open (ie as an ascii string) but not as a unicode one while you can still have u"\xe2" as a valid string – trez Jun 18 '13 at 5:58
    
You were trying to read the file in as a UTF-8 string. Only certain sequences of bytes are valid UTF-8 data; the one in the header of the PDF is not valid. – duskwuff Jun 18 '13 at 6:21
    
@trez The \xe2 in '\xe2' (string) and u"\xe2" (unicode string) don't mean the same thing. In the former, it's a literal byte. In the latter, it's the Unicode code point. It just happens to be the case that for â, the Latin-1 representation is the byte \xe2, and the Unicode codepoint U+00E2. It's (for practical purposes) just a coincidence. – Cairnarvon Jun 18 '13 at 6:32

The issue of trying to interpret arbitrary binary data as text aside, 0xe2 is â in Latin-1, not UTF-8. You're using the wrong codec.

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not really, my editor thing it's latin1 and display it as â but in fact that's only the value 0xe2 – trez Jun 18 '13 at 5:59
    
Editors do best guesses based on normally found text file contents. PDF is not a text file. Thus, your editor's guess is meaningless. – mkl Jun 18 '13 at 6:34

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