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Ikegami, It's your time to shine again. But I think this post will get downvoted, nonetheless I'm desperate so I'm going to ask this one. I am reading a book on perl and so far I understand the concept of OOP until i encountered this code:

sub new {
    my $invocant = shift;
    my $class   = ref($invocant) || $invocant;
    my $self = {
        color  => "bay",
        legs   => 4,
        owner  => undef,
        @_,                 # Override previous attributes
    };
    return bless $self, $class;
}
$ed       = Horse->new;                    # A 4-legged bay horse
$stallion = Horse->new(color => "black");  # A 4-legged black horse

What I see in that code is that whatever is passed in the new subroutine is considered as the package name which will be converted into an object reference with this code:

my $invocant = shift; #this one just get the name of the package which is the argument passed

return bless $self, $class;

  1. Now what is the use of the pre-declaration of the hash (not empty hash)? and why is the @_ supplied in the last part of the list? what for?

Next is this statement based on that code above:

This Horse constructor ignores its invocant's existing attributes when used as an instance method. You could create a second constructor designed to be called as an instance method, and if designed properly, you could use the values from the invoking object as defaults for the new one:

which 90% of that statement I dont understand.

  1. What is an instance method? or object method? can you provide an example?

I know that this one my $class = ref($invocant) || $invocant; are object and instance methods but Im not sure how they differ or how to use them differently.

The "second constructor" mentioned above is this:

$steed  = Horse->new(color => "dun");
$foal   = $steed->clone(owner => "EquuGen Guild, Ltd.");
sub clone {
    my $model = shift;
    my $self  = $model->new(%$model, @_);
    return $self;     # Previously blessed by ->new
}

Which again, I have no idea what it does. So anyone can clarify this for me.

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1  
Do you have experience in any other OO language, e.g. Java? This could help to explain Perl OO in terms you understand. –  amon Jun 18 '13 at 7:13
    
No I dont. sorry. Can you just explain it without using OOP words. Just plain english words? –  Belmark Caday Jun 18 '13 at 7:14
    
Also, this is a pretty advanced example of OO. Do you understand how the most basic Perl constructor works? –  DVK Jun 18 '13 at 7:14
    
@DVK yes I understand how to make a constructor. Make a package and pass that package name to a subroutine which have bless statement so that it will be converted to an object instead of just a plain simple package. –  Belmark Caday Jun 18 '13 at 7:16
    
@user2492415 - you are getting confused because you're jumping a bit too far ahead. First read how the most basic constructors and objects work. Also, in SE, you should ask separate questions in separate posts - you should break this up into at least 3 questions if not more. –  DVK Jun 18 '13 at 7:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Now what is the use of the pre-declaration of the hash (not empty hash)? and why is the @_ supplied in the last part of the list? what for?

This is a very clever approach which lets you achieve 2 things at once:

  1. Allow you to have default values for the constructor

  2. Allow you to override some (or all) of those defaults with a has passed in to the constructor call.


How does this work? Based on 3 things you need to know about hashes:

  • A hash can be treated as a list, by flattening out into a "key1", "value1", "key2", "value2" ... list. This happens if you pass a hash as a parameter to a subroutine: mySub(%hash1)

  • A list (with even # of elements) can be turned INTO a hash via a reverse process.

  • A hash, constructed from a list, where a certain key is encountered more than once, will ONLY have that key once, and - important here - the value of that key in the resulting hash will be the LAST instance among values associated with that key.

In other words, the following 4 assignments produce the same exact resulting data structure:


    my %hash1;
    $hash1{20} = 2;
    $hash1{40} = 4;

    my %hash2 = ( 20, 2, 40, 4); # Notice that "," is same as "=>"

    my %hash3 = ( 20 => 2, 40 => 4); # Notice that "," is same as "=>"

    my %hash4 = ( 40 => 1, 40 => 3, 20 => 2, 40 => 4); 
    # first 2 couples will be effectively ignored, due to same keys later on

Example:

  • If you pass in a hash that has no color key but legs: Horse->new(legs=>3)

    • @_ array will contain 2 elements, "legs" and "3" (obtained by flattening that hash).

    • Your new hash - to be assigned to $self - will then be constructed from the following list:

       ("color","bay", 
       "legs", "4", # Will get overwritten
       # more 
       "legs", "3")
      
    • Now, as per the third bullet above, "legs","4" pair is overwritten by later "legs","3" in a hash assignment; so the resulting hash will have a (default) value of "bay" for the color, and a passed-via-constructor-arguments value of "3" for legs.

share|improve this answer
    
but legs will be shifted am i correct? with this statement my $invocant = shift;leaving with only 4. What would the effect of that? –  Belmark Caday Jun 18 '13 at 7:37
    
@user - no, the string "Horse" - class name - will be shifted. See my second answer. –  DVK Jun 18 '13 at 7:39
    
Based on my 2 month understanding of Perl, whatever is in @_ will be shifted with this statement - shift; So can you explain why only Horse will be shifted and then again @_ is used as an argument inside the hash? –  Belmark Caday Jun 18 '13 at 7:48
    
shift only shifts one element out of the array - first one. other N-1 elements stay in the array. –  DVK Jun 18 '13 at 7:50
    
And last question, what could be the possible contents of the package Horse? so that whatever is the default argument inside the hash will be in sort of use for that package? I mean how to use that default value inside the hash? –  Belmark Caday Jun 18 '13 at 7:51

What is an instance method? or object method? can you provide an example?

Instance and object methods are the same thing. Instance is a Java term for one object, Perl more frequently uses "object" instead, though it depends on book/documentation.

In Perl, there are 3 syntactical ways to call a subroutine in a package:

  • Non-OO (subroutine) method:

    mySub(@parameters)

    Effect: within the sub, a special array variable @_ will contain (well, be aliased, but let's keep things simple) @parameters and nothing else.

  • OO Object (or instance) call:

    $obj->mySub(@parameters);

    Now, this assumes that mySub is a method in a package, of which $obj is a created object.

    Effect: within the sub, a special array variable @_ will contain a list consisting of prepending the object $obj to the list @parameters.

  • OO Package (or class, or sometimes called static) call:

    MyClassName->mySub(@parameters);

    Now, this assumes that mySub is a method in a MyClassName package.

    Effect: within the sub, a special array variable @_ will contain a list consisting of prepending the string "MyClassName" - the package name - to the list @parameters.

    This last one is how constructors work.

    • When you call Horse->new("legs"=>3);, the @_ array will contain a list of THREE elements inside the new() sub: "Horse", "legs" and "3".

    • When your constructor does my $invocant = shift;, it removed string "Horse" from @_ and assignes it as a value to $invocant variable, leaving @_ to contain the original argument list, "legs" and "3".

You should read perlobj documentation to help you as a guide.

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Now what is the use of the pre-declaration of the hash (not empty hash)? and why is the @_ supplied in the last part of the list? what for?

When you assign a list to a hash, the list is treated as a list of key-value pairs. If a key appears twice, the latter value will overwrite the earlier one. As such, the key-values before the @_ are defaults which can be overridden by the arguments passed to new (@_).

Which again, I have no idea what it does.

It creates a new object, passing the values of the invocant to the constructor in order to duplicate the invocant.

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So if i provide legs => 4 legs will be shifted. Leaving me with 4. then what? –  Belmark Caday Jun 18 '13 at 7:39
    
The invocant of a method call is passed as the first argument. It's not legs you're shifting but Horse. –  ikegami Jun 18 '13 at 7:45
    
Hi @ikegami, the only way to declare an object is by writing a subroutine inside a package which have bless statement? Cant i bless some hash reference outside a package <- that package I want to become an object? –  Belmark Caday Jun 18 '13 at 8:22
1  
@BelmarkCaday, You 'can' but nobody will recommend it as a general practice. –  tjd Jun 18 '13 at 13:20
    
bless is what creates an object. What calls bless can vary. –  ikegami Jun 18 '13 at 15:48

0. Terminology

  • In Perl OO, methods are just regular subroutines. The object a method was invoked on is called the invocant, and passed as first argument. The invocant can also be a package name.

    $invocant->method(@args)
    # roughly equivalent to Class::method($invocant, @args)
    
  • An attribute is a property of our object. Not every object must have attributes, but for now we pretend this is the case. We model the attributes as a hash. E.g.

    my $object = bless { x => 1.0, y => -12 } => 'Point';
    

    has two attributes x and y.

  • Perl does not treat instance methods and class methods differently. An instance method is meant to be called on an object, whereas a class method is meant to be called on the package name:

    Class->class_method;
    my $foo = Class->new; # another class method
    $foo->instance_method;
    

    But, Perl itself does not prevent you from doing whatever you like, e.g. $foo->class_method.

1. Explanation of the constructor

The constructor is passed an invocant, and optional arguments. The invocant can either be an object, or the class name. If it is an object, we obtain the class of the object with the ref builtin (the ref of a plain string is the empty string, which is a false value). I advise against this idiom, it raises false expectations of prototype-based OO, and returns true values for all references, not just for objects.

Next, we set up a hash with attributes/properties/fields. First come the default values. Then, we treat the @_ as a hash, which is used to override default values. In a hash constructor, all values are evaluated, but only the last entry is kept. E.g.

my %hash = ( x => 1, x => 2 );

has $hash{x} == 2. In the constructor, @_ = (legs => 8, owner => 'Odin') would override the legs and owner values. If no arguments are passed to the constructor, no values are overridden.

2. Explaining that weird sentence

This Horse constructor ignores its invocant's existing attributes when used as an instance method. You could create a second constructor designed to be called as an instance method, and if designed properly, you could use the values from the invoking object as defaults for the new one

If we set up a horse like

my $sleipnir = Horse->new(legs => 8, owner => 'Odin');

and create another horse

my $shadowfax = $sleipnir->new(owner => 'Gandalf');

we might have the expectation that $shadowfax too has eight legs. This is not the case: The invocant is just used to indicate the class, and not to provide default values. That is, above statement is equivalent to

my $shadowfax = Horse->new(owner => 'Gandalf');

If we want to use an invocant to provide default values, we ought to write a new method, e.g. clone that returns a (modified) copy of the object.

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It's already been explained what the @_ line is doing, here's a slightly more understandable version (not an answer, just adding to discussion - would have posted as comment except for need for code formatting):

sub new {
    my ($invocant,%args) = @_;
    my $class   = ref($invocant) || $invocant;

    my $self = {
        color  => "bay",
        legs   => 4,
        owner  => undef,
        %args,                 # Override previous attributes
    };
    return bless $self, $class;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't have thought of that way - my ($invocant,%args) = @_; –  Belmark Caday Jun 18 '13 at 10:17
    
There are pros and cons to unpacking arguments in a single line and in separate lines (e.g. with shift), and it depends on the code - with experience the choice will become clearer as to what is most readable/useful. Alternatively a single codebase-wide decision could be made, for company coding standards, for example. –  plusplus Jun 18 '13 at 10:34
my $class   = ref($invocant) || $invocant;

I'm not sure which book you're reading, but that line is encouraging bad practices. It's creating a constructor method that can be called either on a class or an object.

That is, you can call it this way:

my $horse = Horse->new;

And this way:

my $other_horse = $horse-new;

It's good OO practice to write methods that are either class methods or object methods. Writing one method that can be called in both ways is generally accepted to be really bad idea.

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