Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After some research over the net about Unique key and unique index. I have understand that both of them validate the column however unique index is better for performance.
what is better, adding a unique key or unique index expecialy if I got a table with 500+ row, (I already used primary key for other columns).
- If unique index is better because of performance, then when do we use unique key? as both of them accept null valuable(by the way can we make them accept only not null valuable ? like'add unique key not null' ?)
-if unique key is better , what if after a year the table is 2000 rows , I am not sure if these table will have alot of records in the future.

edit:
I was trying to use unique key on a duplicate column, even with novalidate it throws me an error. I had to creat an index on the duplicate column.

share|improve this question
    
Related: "novalidate with error ora-02299" –  Yasir Arsanukaev Jun 18 '13 at 8:55
1  
"what if after a year the table is 2000 rows". Seriously? It's 2013, we're in the age of the exabyte. –  APC Jun 18 '13 at 11:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

both UNIQUE INDEX and UNIQUE KEY enforces uniqueness of the values of the field. But if you have to reference the field with the foreign key from other table, then you need unique KEY.

by the way can we make them accept only not null valuable ?

Yes, use both NOT NULL AND UNIQUE CONSTRAINT

And of course, if you want performance on the search by that field, add INDEX on that field.

share|improve this answer
    
no I dont need a foreign key so should I choose unique index ? –  Moudiz Jun 18 '13 at 7:19
    
I suggest using Unique key. Because unique constraint will create unique index to enforce integrity –  chetan Jun 18 '13 at 7:24
    
"And of course, if you want performance on the search by that field, add INDEX on that field." ... a unique constraint requires an index anyway -- not sure what you're saying here. –  David Aldridge Jun 18 '13 at 8:46
    
An index on a FK column would be a reasonable thing to have. But indeed not sure if the answerer is talking about this kind of index. –  Yasir Arsanukaev Jun 18 '13 at 9:02
    
By the way, please avoid using the term "field" WRT databases ;-) Take a look at "What is the difference between a 'record' and a 'row' in SQL Server?" –  Yasir Arsanukaev Jun 18 '13 at 9:06

Your whole question is predicated on "I have understand that both of them validate the column however unique index is better for performance." This is very doubtful as a unique constraint is usually supported by a unique index anyway, and there's very little difference in performance between unique and non-unique indexes. A unique constraint is always supported by an index.

We use a unique constraint because an index is not a constraint, it's just an enforcement mechanism. You can use a unique constraint supported by a non-unique index to allow the constraint to be deferrable also.

share|improve this answer

It's mainly about semantics. A unique key is an actual rule. A unique index is an index that helps Oracle to (quickly) enforce that rule. In older versions of Oracle ( < 8), creating a unique key also made Oracle create an index automatically. Later, this was changed.

A great post, explaining the differences and history in more detail can be found here:

http://www.jlcomp.demon.co.uk/faq/uk_idx_con.html

share|improve this answer
    
yes i saw his article he explained the difference in a good way but which one should I choose and also he added : 'The practical difference between using a unique index to support data integrity and a unique key or primary key on the same columns since Oracle will build an index to support the constraint if you do not' is that mean my unique key will have a index ? –  Moudiz Jun 18 '13 at 7:15
1  
@GolezTrol -- you should replace that link with jlcomp.demon.co.uk/faq/uk_idx_con.html -- Anantha just copied someone else's article and passed it off as his own without attribution. –  David Aldridge Jun 18 '13 at 9:22
    
@DavidAldridge You're right. I've changed the link. –  GolezTrol Jun 18 '13 at 10:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.