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There is a key named _channel in the process object of a forked process. The key contains the following

_channel: {
    fd: null,
    writeQueueSize: 0,
    buffering: false,
    onread: [Function],
    sockets: {
        got: {},
        send: {}
    }
}

The source code of node.js says that the setupChannel function sets this (_channel) key.

I want to know would it be right to assume that to identify whether this process is master or forked one, we need to check if _channel key exist?

Also is there a documentation for Node.js source code?

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If you see in child_process.js, _channel will be null once its disconnected. So I think you can't be sure whether its disconnected or not a forked process. –  Салман Jun 18 '13 at 9:49
    
Is this just because you want to fork on the same js file that node ran initially, or do you specifically want to know about _channel? –  loganfsmyth Jun 19 '13 at 5:01
    
Yes, want to fork the same file that node ran initially. However, I want to be able to differentiate in any file, whether it is a forked one or ran normally using node file.js –  Jeo Jun 27 '13 at 5:41

1 Answer 1

What I understand from your question is you want to be able to identify whether or not the current process is a child of any other process and if its able to send the message to the parent.

If its right then you can use the connected property of the process object, like:

if (process.connected) {
  // do something
}

According to the documentation

way to check if you can send messages is to see if the child.connected property is true.

It won't be present if the process doesn't have any parent, and it will be false if the child is already disconnected from the parent

Hope that helps :)

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