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I have this class implementation for a database connection. Now, this is not a standard SQL database.

I need to know if the following is a good implementation, and if not - why.

I required a singleton class with parameters and this is how I designed it.

class Connection 
{
    private string param1;
    private string param2;
    private static readonly IList<Connection> connections = new List<Connection>();
    private Connection()
    {
        //Prevent instantiation
    }

    private Connection(string param1, string param2)
    {
        this.param1 = param1;
        this.param2 = param2;
    }

    public static Connection getInstance(string param1, string param2)
    { 
        foreach(Connection c in connections)
        {
            if(c.param1 = param1 && c.param2 == param2)
                return c;
        }
        Connection new_conn = new Connection(param1, param2);
        connections.Add(new_conn);
        return new_conn;
    }
}

It will be used as follows:

Connection c = Connection.getInstance(abc, xyz);
Connection d = Conn

*UPDATE - Is it okay now? *

class Connection 
{
    private string param1;
    private string param2;
    private static readonly ConcurrentDictionary<Tuple<string, string, string>, Connection> connections
        = new ConcurrentDictionary<Tuple<string, string>, Connection>();
    private Connection()
    {
        //Prevent instantiation
    }

    private Connection(string param1, string param2)
    {
        this.param1 = param1;
        this.param2 = param2;
    }

    public static Connection getInstance(string param1, string param2)
    { 
        Connection conn = activeConnections.GetOrAdd(new Tuple<string, string> 
            param1,param2), new Connection (param1, param2));
        return conn;
    }
}
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closed as off topic by jgauffin, Gert Arnold, Lex, Manuel, gideon Jun 18 '13 at 14:21

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1  
Voted as offtopic, belongs at codereview.stackexchange.com –  jgauffin Jun 18 '13 at 10:50
    
@jgauffin I did not know such a site existed. I will post there from hereon. Thanks –  rtindru Jun 18 '13 at 11:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, it's not thread-safe - you're modifying List<T> without any sort of synchronization, and List<T> is not thread-safe.

Additionally, you could end up with two connections with the same parameters, if two calls come in at the same time, both look through all the existing connections, and then both create a new one.

I suggest you use ConcurrentDictionary, with a key of a tuple of the two parameters. Aside from anything else, this will also be more efficient.

You'd want to call GetOrAdd to fetch an existing connection or create and add a new one.

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I will modify the code. Will that solve thread issues? What about locks mentioned by the reply below? –  rtindru Jun 18 '13 at 9:43
1  
@rtindru: Using ConcurrentDictionary would handle the threading issues for you, yes. It does require that you're using .NET 4+ though. –  Jon Skeet Jun 18 '13 at 9:47
    
Also do I use a concatenation of my 2 params as the Key? How should I model the key? –  rtindru Jun 18 '13 at 9:47
1  
@rtindru: As I said in the answer, use a tuple (so in your case, a Tuple<string, string>). Or you could create your own class, potentially. –  Jon Skeet Jun 18 '13 at 9:48
1  
@Sniffer: Yes - the purpose of ConcurrentDictionary is to provide a mostly-lock-free yet thread-safe dictionary. Using a dictionary is also more efficient than using a list, given that we basically want to provide a lookup. If the list got big and you had many threads, performing an O(N) fetch while holding a lock could get nasty. –  Jon Skeet Jun 18 '13 at 11:36

This will not even compile since your collection "connections" is non-static?

Maybe this is al little better:

class Connection
{
    private readonly string param1;
    private readonly string param2;
    private  static readonly IList<Connection> connections = new List<Connection>();

    private Connection()
    {
        //Prevent instantiation
    }

    private Connection(string param1, string param2)
    {
        this.param1 = param1;
        this.param2 = param2;
    }

    public static Connection getInstance(string param1, string param2)
    {

        lock (connections)
        {
            var connection = connections.FirstOrDefault(c => c.param1.Equals(param1) && c.param2.Equals(param2));
            if (connection != null)
            {
                return connection;
            }
            else
            {
                var new_conn = new Connection(param1, param2);
                connections.Add(new_conn);
                return new_conn;
            } 
        }
    }

}

But it still seems al little strange to me to hold the List of type Connection inside the Connection class...

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