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I have created a hash table from a text file like this:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %h;

open my $fh, '<', 'tst' or die "failed open 'tst' $!";
while ( <$fh> ) {
  push @{$h{keys}}, (split /\t/)[0];
}
close $fh;

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper \%h;

Now I want to look for a field in another text file in the hash table. if it exists the current line is written in a result file:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %h;

open my $fh, '<', 'tst' or die "failed open 'tst' $!";
while ( <$fh> ) {
  push @{$h{keys}}, (split /\t/)[0];
}
close $fh;


use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper \%h;

open (my $fh1,"<", "exp") or die "Can't open the file: ";

while (my $line =<$fh1>){

chomp ($line);



my ($var)=split(">", $line);

if exists $h{$var};
print ($line);

}

I got these errors:

syntax error at codeperl.pl line 26, near "if exists" 
Global symbol "$line" requires explicit package name at codeperl.pl line 27. 
syntax error at codeperl.pl line 29, near "}" 
Execution of codeperl.pl aborted due to compilation errors.

Any idea please?

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2 Answers 2

What is there to say? The statement if exists $h{$var}; is a syntax error. You may want:

print $line, "\n" if exists $h{$var};

or

if (exists $h{$var}) {
  print $line, "\n";
}

The other errors will go away once you fixed that. If you get multiple errors, always look at the first error (with respect to the line numbers). Later errors are often a result of a previous one. In this case, the syntax error messed up the parsing.


Edit

your main problem isn't the syntax error, it is how you populate your hash. The

push @{$h{keys}}, (split /\t/)[0];

pushes first field on the line onto the arrayref that is in the keys entry. To me, it seems that you actually want to use this field as the key:

my ($key) = split /\t/;
$h{$key} = undef;   # any value will do.

After that, your Dumper \%h will produce something like

$VAR1 = {
  '@ ries bibliothèques électroniques à travers' => undef,
  'a a pour les ressortissants des'              => undef,
  'a a priori aucune hiérarchie des'             => undef,
};

and your lookup via exists should work.

share|improve this answer
    
I have no idea what your comment means (it doesn't help that I don't speak French). If you want to show example input (a good idea), please edit your question. –  amon Jun 18 '13 at 10:12
    
First, Sorry for my bad English :( i have this in the hash table :$VAR1 = { 'keys' => [ '@ ries bibliothèques électroniques à travers', 'a a pour les ressortissants des', 'a a priori aucune hiérarchie des', ] }; in the input file "exp" there is this : "@ ries bibliothèques électroniques à travers > the buildings which (0.000000183067019)" So the script will search for ""@ ries bibliothèques électroniques à travers" which is normally exist in the hash table.. but it cannot find it –  Cyrine Ezzahra Jun 18 '13 at 10:20
    
@CyrineEzzahra Your hash only has one key: keys. See my update to see how to populate the hash correctly, so that it has multiple keys. –  amon Jun 18 '13 at 10:28
    
use strict; use warnings; my %h; open my $fh, '<', 'tst' or die "failed open 'tst' $!"; while ( <$fh> ) { my ($key) = split /\t/; $h{$key} = 1; } close $fh; use Data::Dumper; print Dumper \%h; open (my $fh1,"<", "exp") or die "Can't open the file: "; while (my $line =<$fh1>){ chomp ($line); my ($var)=split(">", $line); if (exists $h{$var}) { print $line, "\n"; } } like this doesnt work also, it cannot find –  Cyrine Ezzahra Jun 18 '13 at 10:39
    
@CyrineEzzahra Ok, then what are the contents of the second file? For exists to return true, the key has to be equal character for character with the field from the file. –  amon Jun 18 '13 at 10:42

just try your code like this

First, build your hash

while(<$file1>){
    # get your key from current line
    $key = (split)[0];

    # set the key into the hash
    $hash{$key} = 1;
}

Second, judge

while(<$file2>){
     # get the field you want you judge
     $value = (split)[0];

     # to see if $value exists
     if( exists $hash{$value} ){
         print "got $value";
     }
}
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1  
what about use strict and use warnings? –  Toto Jun 18 '13 at 11:37
    
@M42 With use strict and use warnings, it can help you avoid some coding mistakes. The code above is just a hint. –  akawhy Jun 18 '13 at 11:46
1  
@akawhy But are you aware that your code won't run under strict? Do you also know that split returns the number of fields in scalar context? –  amon Jun 18 '13 at 11:57
    
@amon Thank you for pointing out that. I'll make some changes of the code –  akawhy Jun 18 '13 at 12:05

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