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forms.py

INPUT_FORMAT = (
('%d/%m/%Y','%m/%d/%Y')
)
class ReportDatetimeForm(forms.ModelForm):
date = forms.DateField(input_formats = INPUT_FORMAT,
widget=forms.DateInput()

class Meta:
model = Report
fields = ['date']

This is my form to get the input as date with two different format.While giving input date in this format %m/%d/%Y' the date and month gets interchange while save in database.That affects in my application.So i want to save both input format in a single format namely yyyy-mm-dd,so what ever input format the user enter ,the given format should save in the above mentioned format.

I want to know how to write a custom function in forms.py to save the date in database in single format.

Thanks

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marked as duplicate by Josh Smeaton, Andrew Barber Jun 18 '13 at 13:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You've asked variations of this question at least 3 times now. Stop abusing stackoverflow. I've provided reasoning as to why you're having problems and it's not a code problem. You fail to understand the basics of using date times. Speak to a colleague of yours and perhaps they can help you understand what you're doing wrong. –  Josh Smeaton Jun 18 '13 at 11:59

1 Answer 1

The actual date that is stored in the database is irrelevant to the input text going in to the field. Dates are stored as date objects, not arbitrary strings.

The problem you're facing is that the two formats you list as valid produce different date objects, for the same input, some of the time. They are ambiguous.

If a user enters the string "01/02/1990" into your form field, what is the actual date? Is it the 1st of February, 1990; or is it the 2nd of January, 1990? In your particular implementation, the date chosen will be the first format: 1st Feb. It will check each date format, in order, and try to parse the date. If it was successful, then it creates the date and saves it. If it was not successful, it tries each successive format.

Either choose a single format, or multiple formats that can never be ambiguous. The use of a javascript calendar picker can be extremely useful, or even individual text inputs for the various parts of the date.

What you should do is only allow ISO8601 date format "YYYY-MM-DD" in your django form. From within the UI you can allow the user to enter in dates in any format they like, as long as you convert it (with javascript) to the "YYYY-MM-DD" format before sending to the server. But what you SHOULD do is have 3 separate text inputs - one each for day, month, and year.

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No, that's not the problem. I explained what the problem is. Try entering this date: "12/29/2013" and see if the date is represented correctly in the database. Choosing a date format in the UI has absolutely NO effect on the allowable form date format. You're providing an ambiguous date as a string, and the form is trying your inputs in order and choosing THAT one. –  Josh Smeaton Jun 18 '13 at 11:29
    
Josh,this problem is happening when both entered date and month are less than 12,how to make it work for all input formats/how to resolve this.I am facing this problem from last friday,please tell me in code level how to solve this. –  user2086641 Jun 18 '13 at 11:44
    
@user2086641 I know when it is happening. My answer explains why it is happening. My answer also explains how you should go about fixing it. This isn't a code problem for you to solve, it is a common sense problem. "01/02/2013" is ambiguous. Use 3 separate text inputs in your form; one each for day, month, and year. Then in the "save" method of your form construct an actual date object. Stop using ModelForms for this particular problem and use a standard form. You need to understand what the actual problem is first. I've done all I can. –  Josh Smeaton Jun 18 '13 at 11:53

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