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I have a question on what's the best design for my domain service. The use case is to create some entities based on user selected conditions.

The workflow of the app that will use this service:

  1. User selects some conditions (like date, and other data)
  2. He gets a list of "propositions" of the entities. He can select all of them, or only some.
  3. The entities are created

What would be the best design for the domain service? I have two in mind:

Solution 1

interface IMyDomainService
{
    IEnumerable<EntityProposition> GetEntitiesPropositions(Conditions conditions);
    void CreateEntities(Conditions conditions);
}

In this case i would probably have some private method on the service that will be used by both of those. EntityProposition class is basicly 1:1 of what will be displayed in the view. There is some data in that class that is not part of the entity itself.

Solution 2

interface IMyDomainService
{
    IEnumerable<EntitiyData> GetDataForEntities(Conditions conditions);
    void CreateEntities(IEnumerable<EntityData> entities);
}

What would be the private method in Solution 1 is now exposed in interface. EnityData class holds all data for the entity that is relevant for creating the entity itself and displaying all the data for view.

To add some context: This service is now used directly by ASP.NET MVC controller. It seems to me, that if i go with solution#2 i will have to create some additional application service, so it will wrap the logic of geting the data and creating entities.

EDIT 1

I will ask the question from different perspective: Should my controller look like this:

public ActionResult GetPropositions(Condtidions condtitions)
{
    var entitiyData= service.GetEntityData(conditions);
    return Json(entitiyData.ToViewModel());
}

public void CreateEntities(Conditions conditions)
{
    var entitiyData= service.GetEntityData(conditions);
    service.CreateEntities(entitiyData);
}

or:

public ActionResult GetPropositions(Condtidions condtitions)
{
    var propositions = service.GetPropositons(conditions);
    return Json(propositions.ToViewModel());
}

public void CreateEntities(Conditions conditions)
{
    service.CreateEntities(conditions);
}

Of course this is simplified example, just to show my point.

Edit 2

Just as a followup: Firstly I gone with the Solution #2, but later my requirements changed, and i had to go back to the Solution #1. The reason behind was that after generating propositions, user could select few of them, but withing the same scope (conditions).

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1  
I really hope that the ToViewModel method is an extension method. Because it do not belong in the domain. As for your edit GetPropositons sounds more like the domain language. –  jgauffin Jun 19 '13 at 11:54
    
There is no "ToViewModel" at all, it's just in the example to show that the result is mapped to the viewmodel after it's retrived. Thanks for your help! –  Botis Jun 19 '13 at 12:49

1 Answer 1

What is the most common case? Creating many entities or creating one?

Also I would not use Entites in the method names, it's pretty obvious that a service works with entities.

To me, the name sounds like you are just wrapping a repository with the services. That's a big no-no. Services in DDD is an extension of domain entities to encaspulate logic where you have to work with two or more entities in the same business case.

If you just need to fetch a entity, modify it and save it you should use the repository directly (no need to abstract away an abstraction).

interface IMyDomainRepository
{
    IEnumerable<EntitiyData> GetData(Conditions conditions);
    void Create(IEnumerable<EntityData> entities);
}
share|improve this answer
    
As for question#1- I would say the most common would be to create entities from all of the propositions. The "entity" is just placeholder- i have better names in my code :) This is not a simple get->edit->save. Lets say i have some bool property in the entity data, and while creatin the entity, i have logic like if (that property && somethingelse && x>8) entity.children.add(something) –  Botis Jun 18 '13 at 11:16
2  
that logic belongs in the entity itself and not a service. –  jgauffin Jun 18 '13 at 11:19
1  
+1 Completely agree with your answer. However it does seem as though EntityProposition is another entity in the domain/bounded context - not just a bunch of parameters that are fed to the repository. It sounds like what we actually want here is a factory. –  MattDavey Jun 18 '13 at 12:36

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