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Let's assume two collections of objects. I want to retrieve the objects in the first collection that are not contained in the 2nd collection.

For collections of primitive types, that's easy:

new[]{1,2,3,4}.Except(new[]{2,3}); //  => {1, 4}

But what if I want to use a more complex structure? In the example below, I want to compare using the Id field.

class Person { string Name; int Id ; }

var lst1 = new[]{ new Person("Ann", 1), new Person("Bob", 2) };
var lst2 = new[]{ new Person("Cathy", 3), new Person("Bob", 2) };

Well, the general consensus seems to offer these two options:

  • Enumerable.Except() plus custom IEqualityComparer<>, along these lines:

-

class IdComparer: IEqualityComparer<Person> { /* boilerplate Equals(), GetHashCode() */ }

lst1.Except(lst2, new IdComparer())
    .Select(p=>p.Name);              // => { "Ann" } 

This method is cumbersome for defining the equality criteria.

  • using a negated .Contains() - still needs an IEqualityComparer<>; or a negated .Any() - this allows specifying the condition inline.

-

from p1 in lst1
where ! lst2.Any(p2 => p1.Id == p2.Id)
select p1.Name;                      // => { "Ann" } 

This is easier to use, but it reads like "for each element in lst1 check each element in lst2" which looks like complexity O(M*N). Not sure if different Linq providers (can) optimize this.

Complexity-wise, the .Except() method fares quite a bit better: roughly O(M+N), as it uses a Set<>.

  • How about the 'left-outer-join-filtered-by-NULLs' trick from Sql? I didn't find references to this one, so either I didn't search enough, or it's flawed.

-

from p1 in lst1
join p2 in lst2 on p1.Id equals p2.Id into grp
where ! grp.Any()
select p1.Name;                     // => { "Ann" }

This allows easy comparison using a field.
Also, from what I can tell (digging into the Enumerable.JoinIterator() implementation), the complexity is still roughly O(M+N).

Is this a good substitute for Enumerable.Except() ?

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2  
You can write a simple projecting EqualityComparer<T> so you need to only write the boilerplate once. –  CodesInChaos Jun 18 '13 at 11:16
    
What about overriding Equals and GetHashCode methods of your person class? –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jun 18 '13 at 11:17
    
@CodesInChaos True - but the 'outer join' method even allows working with collections of different types, as long as there is a common "key" - and the boilerplate is 0 –  Cristi Diaconescu Jun 18 '13 at 11:46

3 Answers 3

You could use ExceptBy extension method from moreLINQ library

It allows you to specify the key used to comparision:

public static IEnumerable<TSource> ExceptBy<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> first,
    IEnumerable<TSource> second,
    Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector)

or even specify the equality comparer:

public static IEnumerable<TSource> ExceptBy<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> first,
    IEnumerable<TSource> second,
    Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector,
    IEqualityComparer<TKey> keyComparer)
share|improve this answer
    
Nice :) Here's an overview of the added operators (ExceptBy() is misteriously missing, so I'm guessing the documentation is a bit outdated) –  Cristi Diaconescu Jun 18 '13 at 13:41
    
So how's that implemented? What's the O() ? –  Cristi Diaconescu Jun 18 '13 at 16:02

I've got a solution, using Except.

Look at this:

public class PropertyEqualityComparer<TObject, TProperty> 
    : IEqualityComparer<TObject>
{
    Func<TObject, TProperty> _selector;
    IEqualityComparer<TProperty> _internalComparer;
    public PropertyEqualityComparer(Func<TObject, TProperty> propertySelector,
        IEqualityComparer<TProperty> innerEqualityComparer = null)
    {
        _selector = propertySelector;
        _internalComparer = innerEqualityComparer;
    }
    public int GetHashCode(TObject obj)
    {
        return _selector(obj).GetHashCode();
    }
    public bool Equals(TObject x, TObject y)
    {
        IEqualityComparer<TProperty> comparer = 
            _internalComparer ?? EqualityComparer<TProperty>.Default;
        return comparer.Equals(_selector(x), _selector(y));
    }
}
public static class PropertyEqualityComparer
{
    public static PropertyEqualityComparer<TObject, TProperty>
        GetNew<TObject, TProperty>(Func<TObject, TProperty> propertySelector)
    { 
        return new PropertyEqualityComparer<TObject, TProperty>
            (propertySelector);
    }
    public static PropertyEqualityComparer<TObject, TProperty>
        GetNew<TObject, TProperty>
        (Func<TObject, TProperty> propertySelector, 
        IEqualityComparer<TProperty> comparer)
    { 
        return new PropertyEqualityComparer<TObject, TProperty>
            (propertySelector, comparer);
    }
}

Basically what it does is allow you to have an IEqualityComparer that can compare using a selector. You can then just use it like this:

lst1.Except(lst2, PropertyEqualityComparer.GetNew(n => n.Id));

(sorry for code formatting, on mobile.)

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If you have a generic equality comparer you can use that to create comparers easily:

public class GenericEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    private Func<T, T, Boolean> _comparer;
    private Func<T, int> _hashCodeEvaluator;
    public GenericEqualityComparer(Func<T, T, Boolean> comparer)
    {
        _comparer = comparer;
    }

    public GenericEqualityComparer(Func<T, T, Boolean> comparer, Func<T, int> hashCodeEvaluator)
    {
        _comparer = comparer;
        _hashCodeEvaluator = hashCodeEvaluator;
    }

    #region IEqualityComparer<T> Members

    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        return _comparer(x, y);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        if (obj == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("obj");
        }
        if (_hashCodeEvaluator == null)
        {
            return 0;
        }
        return _hashCodeEvaluator(obj);
    }

    #endregion
}

You would then use it like this:

var comparer = new GenericEqualityComparer<T>((x, y) => { return x.ID == y.ID; });
var result = listOfStuff.Except(listToRemove, comparer);

//your example
var comparer = new GenericEqualityComparer<Person>((x, y) => { return x.Id == y.Id; });
var result = listOfStuff.Except(listToRemove, comparer);

I also use this the generic equality comparer when i want to look at certain values in a .Distict()

var comparer = new GenericEqualityComparer<Person>((x, y) => { return x.Name == y.Name; });
var distinctNames = listOfAllNames.Distict(comparer);
share|improve this answer
    
Uour code has an inconsistent hashcode by default and it doesn't treat null correctly => broken –  CodesInChaos Jun 18 '13 at 12:14
    
@CodesInChaos could you elaborate on the hashcode? –  FRoZeN Jun 18 '13 at 12:16
    
Create two objects with the same ID and use new GenericEqualityComparer<T>((x, y) => { return x.ID == y.ID; }). It won't treat them as equal in Except because they have different hashcodes. –  CodesInChaos Jun 18 '13 at 12:19
    
@CodesInChaos The hashcode evaluator now has a consistent behavior when it isnt supplied. –  FRoZeN Jun 18 '13 at 12:30
    
But now you have O(m*n) performance not O(m+n) like the OP wants. In my experience a projecting equality comparer that projects the input to the identifying value is far more useful that one which takes the equality comparer as lambda. –  CodesInChaos Jun 18 '13 at 12:46

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