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I heard that in "c" that there are we can pass the arguments via "call by value" or "call by reference". But in one book it's mentioned that there are we can pass the arguments via both way but there is no "pass by reference" but I actually pass the mostly arguments by "pass by reference".

So why it is mentioned "does C even have "pass by reference"?

A detailed description will be greatly appreciated.

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2  
There is no pass-by-reference in C. –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 18 '13 at 12:18
    
where did you hear it? and how do you manage to pass-by-reference in C? (You are be mistaken) –  VusP Jun 18 '13 at 12:18
    
@SuvP there is no thing pass by reference in "c" but pass by reference means that we are passing the address to access the data via pointer but my question is that while we are passing the address to access the data why it's mentioned there is no "pass by reference". while we are accessing that same data via call by value or call by reference. –  Varun Chhangani Jun 18 '13 at 12:24
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

C parameters are always passed by value rather than by reference. However, if you think of the address of an object as being a reference to that object then you can pass that reference by value. For example:

void foo(int *x)
{
    *x = 666;
}

You ask in a comment:

So why do we need pointers in C when we can pass all the parameters by value?

Because in a language that only supports pass-by-value, lack of pointers would be limiting. It would mean that you could not write a function like this:

void swap(int *a, int *b)
{
    int temp = *a;
    *b = *a;
    *a = temp;
}

In Java for example, it is not possible to write that function because it only has pass-by-value and has no pointers.

In C++ you would write the function using references like this:

void swap(int &a, int &b)
{
    int temp = a;
    b = a;
    a = temp;
}

And similarly in C#:

void swap(ref int a, ref int b)
{
    int temp = a;
    b = a;
    a = temp;
}
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I don't know who give downvote to me –  Varun Chhangani Jun 18 '13 at 12:26
    
@ David Heffernan there is no thing pass by reference in "c" but pass by reference means that we are passing the address to access the data via pointer but my question is that while we are passing the address to access the data why it's mentioned there is no "pass by reference". while we are accessing that same data via call by value or call by reference. –  Varun Chhangani Jun 18 '13 at 12:26
    
@David Heffernan I know that so why we need pointer in "c" when we can pass all the parameters by value???? –  Varun Chhangani Jun 18 '13 at 12:28
1  
If you did not have pointers, then you could not "fake" pass by reference. Or as Kerrek puts it (more clearly than I did), without pointers you would not be able to assemble reference semantics yourself. –  David Heffernan Jun 18 '13 at 12:30
    
@ David Heffernan This is the actual answer which I want Thanks –  Varun Chhangani Jun 18 '13 at 12:42
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The concept of "reference semantics" is an abstract, theoretical one, meaning that you have a way for a function to modify existing data in place by giving that function a reference to the data.

The question is whether reference semantics can be implemented by a language. In C, you can obtain reference semantics by using pointers. That means you can obtain the desired behaviour, but you need to assemble it yourself from various bits and pieces (pointer types, address-of operators, dereference operators, passing pointers as function arguments ("by value")).

By contrast, C++ contains a native reference type and thus implements reference semantics directly in the language.

Other languages have different approaches to this, for example, in Python many things are references by default (and there's a difference, say, between a = b and a = b[:] when b is a list). Whether and how a language provides reference vs value semantics is a profound part of the language's design.

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