Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't understand, why eval works like this:

"123 #{456.to_s} 789" # => "123 456 789"
eval('123 #{456.to_s} 789') # => 123

How can I interpolate into a string inside eval?

Update:

Thank you, friends. It worked.

So if you have a string variable with #{} that you want to eval later, you should do it as explained below:

string = '123 #{456} 789' 
eval("\"" + string + "\"")
# => 123 456 789

or

string = '123 #{456} 789' 
eval('"' + string + '"')
# => 123 456 789
share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean by "macro substitutions"? –  sawa Jun 18 '13 at 13:14
    
@sawa, i meant #{} sections, please , edit it in right way, I just don't know how to say it on english –  Flextra Jun 18 '13 at 13:45
1  
Okay, maybe you meant interpolation. –  sawa Jun 18 '13 at 13:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

What's happening, is eval is evaluating the string as source code. When you use double quotes, the string is interpolated

eval '"123 #{456.to_s} 789"'
# => "123 456 789"

However when you use single quotes, there is no interpolation, hence the # starts a comment, and you get

123 #{456.to_s} 789
# => 123

The string interpolation happens before the eval call because it is the parameter to the method.

Also note the 456.to_s is unnecessary, you can just do #{456}.

share|improve this answer
1  
Replacing the single quotes with double quotes gives a syntax error because eval("123 #{456.to_s} 789") is evaluated as 123 456 789 –  Stefan Jun 18 '13 at 13:27

You wanted:

eval('"123 #{456.to_s} 789"')

. . . hopefully you can see why?

The code passed to the interpretter from eval is exactly as if you had written it (into irb, or as part of a .rb file), so if you want an eval to output a string value, the string you evaluate must include the quotes that make the expression inside it a String.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.