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I am using node.js

I have a function with several parameters I need to call inside a loop. The function must be called with the loop iterator as a parameter and the loop must not call the function again until it is finished processing.

Something like this (sync method): (note that someFunc is an asynchronous function)

var totCount = 1000;
for (var x = 0 ; x < totCount ; x++) {
    someFunc(x, parm2, parm3, parm4);
}

I understand that in node, someFunc could execute in any order but for this case, it absolutely must execute with x = 0 then 1 then 2 etc.

It seems that the async library call "async.whilst" will do this but I am having trouble translating the example into my real life code.

Here is the example for "async.whilst":

var count = 0;

async.whilst(
    function () { return count < 5; },
    function (callback) {
        count++;
        setTimeout(callback, 1000);
    },
    function (err) {
        // 5 seconds have passed
    }
);

Note that since I potentially have to call the function someFunc many times, normal callback approach will not work.

How do I translate this into my code? (I am assuming "async.whilst" is the correct approach. If not please specify correct approach)

share|improve this question
    
Is someFunc synchronous or can you provide a callback as an argument that is called when it's done? –  Andreas Hultgren Jun 18 '13 at 13:28
    
If someFunc is not asynchronous it won't execute in any order but in the order the functions are called. –  Andreas Hultgren Jun 18 '13 at 13:29
    
someFunc is asynchronous. Would I just append the callback argument after all the parameters? –  SeanDav Jun 18 '13 at 13:31
    
If someFunc takes a callback as the last argument yes. I'll write an example as an answer –  Andreas Hultgren Jun 18 '13 at 13:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following example will work assuming that someFunc is async and takes a callback as the last argument. Whether or not it does depends on how it's implemented. If it's part of another library it probably does.

var count = 0;
var totCount = 1000;

async.whilst(
  function () { return count < totCount; },
  function (callback) {
    someFunc(count, parm2, parm3, parm4, callback);
    count++;
  },
  function (err) {
      // someFunc has been called totCount times, or an error has occured
  }
);

In case someFunc is not async but you want to run the loop asynchronously to avoid blocking, you would simply call the callback after the function call.

//...
  function (callback) {
    someFunc(x, parm2, parm3, parm4);
    count++;
    callback();
  },
// ...

Update

Doing it without async/promises (not tested):

var count = 0;
var totCount = 1000;

function loop () {
  // Async lets you provide you own check-method
  if(count >= totCount) {
    // Async lets you provide your own done-method
    return done();
  }

  // Async does setImmediate/process.nextTick somewhere around here
  myFunc(count, param, param, function() {
    // Async checks for errors here
    count++;
    loop();
  });
}

function done () {
  // Async provides any errors here
  console.log("done");
}

I commented where async does some extra stuff that's probably good to have (most approximately, check out the source code for specifics, it's surprisingly easy to read). For example if someFunc is not actually asynchronous but just calls a callback, this will kill the event loop just as much as using for(...).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this - testing it out now. How on earth would this be solved without access to an Async or Promises type library? –  SeanDav Jun 18 '13 at 13:46
1  
@SeanDav I updated the answer with an example not using async. It's actually rather simple. If it's server-side code I don't see the point in reinventing the wheel though. –  Andreas Hultgren Jun 18 '13 at 14:48
    
I am going to try out something similar not using async, just to learn how it is done. Your async.whilst solution works great thanks. –  SeanDav Jun 18 '13 at 14:52

Sounds like you want to use promises, assuming you can set someFunc up so it returns a promise. You could do something like this:

var promise=new Promise().fulfill();
var totCount = 1000;
for (var x = 0 ; x < totCount ; x++) {
    promise=promise.then(function(){return someFunc(x, parm2, parm3, parm4);});
}
promise.then(function(){console.log("done");});

The exact syntax will depend on the promises library you choose to use.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. I did install Q prior to coming here but decided that since I was already using "async" I would try stick with an "async" solution. Going to try your example out anyway as it looks fairly elegant and straightforward. –  SeanDav Jun 18 '13 at 13:42

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