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First, thanks for any tips or advice in advance. I'm not a programmer, but I also don't have any other way to access my data for analysis so I've been learning (most by searching StackOverflow and Google).

So the following query works as intended, but it's just slow. I'm thinking I have places I could optimize the code but I was already patting myself on the back for making it work so I'm out of ideas. Any ideas on how I could speed it up?

The basic idea is it takes budget data and actual data for an ID, zero's out the time for each (so it's a time-independent comparison), and computes a ratio of budget to actual cumulative performance.

EDIT: Using SQL Server Management Studio 2008 R2, added execution plan

NOTE: Table variables only used to test code. Permanent tables used in full scale code.

DECLARE @DailyBudget TABLE ( ID varchar(30), D_Date datetime, A float, B float) 
DECLARE @DailyActuals TABLE ( ID varchar(30), D_Date datetime, A float, B float) 

Insert into @DailyActuals (ID, D_Date, A, B) 
Values
('J3PJKFWDBK',  '5/20/2013', 300,1301)
,('J3PJKFWDBK', '5/21/2013', 290,1351)
,('J3PJKFWDBK', '5/23/2013', 283,1320)

Insert into @DailyBudget (ID, D_Date, A, B) 
Values
('J3PJKFWDBK',  '5/1/2013', 263,1401)
,('J3PJKFWDBK', '5/2/2013', 260,1390)
,('J3PJKFWDBK', '5/3/2013', 257,1380)

;WITH Budgets AS
(SELECT ID, D_Date, A, B,
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY ID ORDER BY D_DATE ASC) as 'RowNum'  from @DailyBudget where not (A = 0 and B = 0) and D_Date > CONVERT(datetime, '2013-01-01 00:00:00.000', 102)
)
, Actuals AS
(SELECT ID, D_DATE, A, B, 
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY ID ORDER BY D_DATE ASC) as 'RowNum'  from @DailyActuals where not (A = 0 and B = 0) and D_Date > CONVERT(datetime, '2013-01-01 00:00:00.000', 102)
)
, BudgetSum AS
(select t1.ID, t1.RowNum, SUM(t2.A) as [A], SUM(t2.B) as [B]
  from Budgets as t1
    inner join Budgets as t2 on t1.RowNum >= t2.RowNum and t1.ID = t2.ID
  group by t1.ID, t1.RowNum, t1.A
)
, ActualSum AS
(select t1.ID, t1.RowNum, SUM(t2.A) as [A], SUM(t2.B) as [B]
  from Actuals as t1
    inner join Actuals as t2 on t1.RowNum >= t2.RowNum and t1.ID = t2.ID
  group by t1.ID, t1.RowNum, t1.A
)
SELECT Budgets.ID, Budgets.D_DATE as [Budget_Date], Actuals.D_DATE as [Actual_Date], 
--A
Budgets.A as [Budget_A], BudgetSum.A as [SumBudget_A], 
Actuals.A as [Actual_A], ActualSum.A as [SumActual_A],
(case BudgetSum.A when 0 then 0 else (ActualSum.A/BudgetSum.A)end) as [A_Ratio],
--B
Budgets.B as [Budget_B], BudgetSum.B as [SumBudget_B], 
Actuals.B as [Actual_B], ActualSum.B as [SumActual_B],
(case BudgetSum.B when 0 then 0 else (ActualSum.B/BudgetSum.B)end) as [B_Ratio]
FROM Budgets 
inner join Actuals on (Actuals.RowNum = Budgets.RowNum and Actuals.ID = Budgets.ID) 
inner join BudgetSum on (Actuals.RowNum = BudgetSum.RowNum and Actuals.ID = BudgetSum.ID)
inner join ActualSum on (Actuals.RowNum = ActualSum.RowNum and Actuals.ID = ActualSum.ID) 
order by Budgets.ID, Budgets.RowNum

Execution Plan from SQL Server 2008:

http://s11.postimg.org/ierhjgvv7/6_18_2013_10_17_26_AM.jpg

share|improve this question
1  
Edit your question, and paste the execution plan. – Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jun 18 '13 at 13:53
1  
It would also help if you included the RDBMS and at least the major version (eg: SQL-Server 2012, Oracle 11i, etc...) – Jason Quinones Jun 18 '13 at 14:24
    
Thanks. I wasn't sure how to paste the execution plan, so I just linked to a picture of it (since I can't post pics yet either) – Tracy Jun 18 '13 at 15:17
    
By the way: float is rarely the correct data type if you want to represent sums of money. I'd change to using decimal if you can. – Ann L. Jun 18 '13 at 16:24
1  
The point about float is still valid: it shouldn't be used in most business situations because it is imprecise. You WILL NOT get the results you want if you don't switch to decimal. Float is for situations where the scale is more important than the precision, or you need to represent very, very small numbers that can't be addressed with decimal. – ErikE Jun 18 '13 at 21:52
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would suggest that, if you are allowed to do so, you set up some smaller versions of these tables and do some experimenting with adding additional indexes. Maybe 10,000 records per table, with different values for ID and D_DATE so you get some representative data. Perhaps a separate, smaller database could be created that you had free reign in.

What I suspect is that you're going to need some additional indexes. For example, the following code sorts by D_DATE (this is from your Budget CTE):

 SELECT ID, D_Date, A, B,
 ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY ID ORDER BY D_DATE ASC) as 'RowNum'  
 from @DailyBudget 
 where not (A = 0 and B = 0) 
     and D_Date > CONVERT(datetime, '2013-01-01 00:00:00.000', 102)

Try creating a second, non-primary index with the same columns, but in the order D_DATE and ID.

Another thing that's probably costing a lot is that you generate RowNum and then group on it, which requires the query engine to sort all these records in RowNum order. I would try something like this:

 WITH Budgets AS
  (SELECT ID, D_Date, A, B
   from @DailyBudget 
   where not (A = 0 and B = 0) 
   and D_Date > CONVERT(datetime, '2013-01-01 00:00:00.000', 102)
 )
, BudgetSum AS
 (select t1.ID, T1.d_date, SUM(t2.A) as [A], SUM(t2.B) as [B]
  from Budgets as t1
  inner join Budgets as t2 on t1.D_DATE >= t2.D_DATE and t1.ID = t2.ID
 group by t1.ID, T1.D_DATE
)

It's almost the same, but it's taking advantage of the index you already have (the primary key) and not requiring the calculation and then sort by RowNum.

Finally, the technique you're using to get the YTD figures by date is perfectly valid, but since your tables have millions of records you're talking possibly multi-billions of joined records to process. It's not surprising that this takes a long time! Consider using some staging tables to hold subsets of your data rather than processing every record going into your final numbers in one go. Or partition your queries (by date, or by ranges of ID) so that you can run faster queries multiple times and assemble the numbers you want in Excel, or in a set of smaller database tables that you can update with additional data as the tables grow.

Hope some of this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Good suggestions. I had a feeling the slow was related to the RowNum and sorting and joining I'm doing, but wasn't sure the right direction to go with it. I'll toy around with the indexes and sorting with that in mind. – Tracy Jun 18 '13 at 22:34

There are 6 table scans that are taking up 18% of your most expensive query. These table scans are all against your table variables @DailyBudget and @DailyActual. Unfortunately you cannot create indexes on table variables unless they are the side effect of creating a unique index, but I suspect that is not going to help you here.

You can create indexes on temporary tables, I would recommend trying to convert your code to use temp tables instead, create the missing indexes and see if that helps. Creating the appropriate indexes may also help with your sorting costs which is taking up 63% of yoru most expensive query.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I should have mentioned the tables variables '@DailyBudget' and '@DailyActuals' are just to run the query with non-confidential data for testing purposes. These are permanent SQL tables in the live code. – Tracy Jun 18 '13 at 15:40
    
Well you are sorting on D_DATE not ID. I'm pretty sure you will see performance improvements if you create some additional indexes. – Abe Miessler Jun 18 '13 at 15:47
    
Hm, not sure what exactly you might mean. Do you mean more than just in the table properties? The tables are both created with the following primary keys: CONSTRAINT [DAILYBUDGET_PRIMARY_KEY] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([ID] ASC,[D_DATE] ASC) WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]) ON [PRIMARY] – Tracy Jun 18 '13 at 19:49
    
You want a non clustered index that includes the other columns you are sorting/filtering on. – Abe Miessler Jun 18 '13 at 23:03

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