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I have a desktop app that has the concept of an entity called Field.

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|   Id    | FieldName |
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|    1    | "Field 1" |
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|    2    | "Field 2" |
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Fields are defined by the user, so there can be as many of them as the user wants. They are associated with another entity called Employee.

Fields have a value (a 16-bits integer calculated and stored by the app) for each day of the year.

Field values are stored in a table where each record holds the values for one full year of one Employee of one Field.

Said table, therefore, looks a bit like this:

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| FieldId | EmployeeId | FieldValues | Year |
---------------------------------------------
|    1    |      4     |    byte[]   | 2012 |
---------------------------------------------
|    2    |      4     |    byte[]   | 2012 |
---------------------------------------------
|    1    |      5     |    byte[]   | 2013 |
---------------------------------------------
|   ...   |     ...    |     ...     |  ... |
---------------------------------------------

FieldValues holds the values as a byte array in a BLOB field, which is then converted back to an array of 16-bits integers before being shown to the user on a grid.

Now that we have a bit of context, the real question.

This is a legacy app, I am not the original designer. It's easy to guess, though, that the goal of storing this data in a binary format was to limit the number of records that would otherwise be necessary to store 365 (or 366) values per year per Employee per Field.

What I'm doing now is a "sync" app which pulls this data from a local Access db (don't ask) and pushes it via a REST API to a web app on a remote server. Such app needs to have a copy of this data so I'll have to store it in its database.

Storing data in a binary format has the clear advantage of really limiting the number of records we need to store, but the disadvantage of being human-unreadable.

On the other hand, the web app is multi-tenant, so storing this data in any other way would mean storing a great number of records: just a couple thousand Employees and an average of 20 Fields would mean storing upwards of 14 million records each year (and Fields are not the only entity that could generate millions of records). Plus, a large number of records per-year wouldn't be a problem per se if somewhere down the road, say every two or three years, we could throw them away; that, however, is not the case.

The real question, then, is how to store said data. Should I stick to the old format?

Can anyone think of a whole different way of going about it?

For the sake of completeness, even though I don't think it matters much, the destination db is Postgres.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should if at all possible properly normalize this data.

Here are some reasons.

Storing data in a binary format has the clear advantage of really limiting the number of records we need to store, but the disadvantage of being human-unreadable.

There are other disadvantages that you're missing including increased concurrency since you have to write all the values back. None of the queries against this data are going to be SARGable, you can't constrain this data on the db level, basically all the problems you have when you violate 1NF

Plus, a large number of records per-year wouldn't be a problem per se if somewhere down the road, say every two or three years, we could throw them away; that, however, is not the case.

I can't think of a valid reason why you can't have a data retention policy. It's very dangerous to do this.

On the other hand, the web app is multi-tenant, so storing this data in any other way would mean storing a great number of records: just a couple thousand Employees and an average of 20 Fields would mean storing upwards of 14 million records each year

That's not a lot of records. Also typically it's the amount of data that you're storing that tends to be an issue first. Most of which is occupied by the data in FieldValues and not the internal bookkeeping that the database has to do.

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Doesn't Postgres have an array column type? Would that benefit his structure more than another table? –  Romoku Jun 18 '13 at 15:36
    
@Romoku yes it does and that's probably better than a blob... but is it sargable? Can you create an FK or other constraints? Do you really want to write this type of SQL. Note that Oracle and SQL server also have similar types and I have the same objections –  Conrad Frix Jun 18 '13 at 15:42
    
Thanks for your reply. About data retention: I'm not saying we won't ever be able to get rid of some data, but that we might have to keep it for a rather long time. I know that 14 million records is not a lot, but that's just an example based on what would be needed to store data about 2000 employees. They're potentially much more, and these Field things aren't the only issue. I do agree with the points you make, though. –  s.m. Jun 18 '13 at 15:49
    
About non-SARGablessness (is that even a word?): I would never really need to query directly on field values, as I'll typically retrieve a record by FieldId and EmployeeId and present data to the user one month at a time. So, while it's true that I would retrieve 732 bytes instead of, let's say, 62 (as it's 16-bits integers we're talking about here), not being able to query by field value wouldn't be a big issue. But I'm no RDBMS guru, so it's very possible that I'm missing something. –  s.m. Jun 18 '13 at 15:52
    
@s.m. it's been my experience that over time, someone will want to use the data for more than display. For example I worked on DB that had a list of emails. It was originally for display and the cc line in an automated email. Four or five years after this it became an integral part of the application. e.g. show me stuff I was cc'd on. That said I could be wrong and the perf is fine. Since you have plenty of test data you should try that use case. You should also try converting the data and see what the perf and data storage is like. For both normalized and the array data type –  Conrad Frix Jun 18 '13 at 16:01

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