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I am using endorsed directory for some jar which can be used from command line. Now I want to make jar as runnable with endorsed directory so that user can just click the runnable jar file to run the application.

I am using Eclipse Helios and Java 6.

Can anyone tell me how to do the above mentioned task.

Regards, Ashish

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What jars are you using from endorsed directory ? –  Makky Jun 18 '13 at 16:00
    
jaxb-api.jar and jaxws-api.jar –  Ashish Nijai Jun 18 '13 at 16:08
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1 Answer

From Eclipse

  • Right Click the project and select "Export"
  • Select Runnable JAR File
  • Select output direct
  • Press Next
  • Press Next
  • Press Finish

Once it is exported it ,let say in C:\

Run Command prompt and change it to c: and run

java -jar XXXX.jar

thats it.

Packaging JAR as EXE.

Download Launch4J here.

Screenshots

Click here

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,I know how to make runnable jar in Eclipse. I am using endorsed directories with my jar. For using endorsed directories, I am using following command: 'java -cp . -jar -Djava.endorsed.dirs=./endorsed my.jar' Instead of these path, I want to use runnable jar so that it will contain endorsed directories, I made runnable jar but it failed to run as it requires libraries which are in endorsed directories. My application worked when I gave aforementioned command line command. –  Ashish Nijai Jun 19 '13 at 6:16
    
So it worked by running java -jar ? –  Makky Jun 19 '13 at 8:05
    
Yes. It worked by using java -jar. But I want to use it as application without using any extra .bat file. Do you have any idea about it? –  Ashish Nijai Jun 19 '13 at 11:41
    
Yes. Its easy. See my updated answer. Upvote and accept it as answer if you think it helps. –  Makky Jun 19 '13 at 12:42
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