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How does one, through jQuery, get the ID of an element that is being clicked on and then pass it as a parameter into a function? Example jQuery code below.

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    var id = this_id;
    jQuery(".lightbox a").click({param: id}, functionName);
});

May I note that the "param" parameter is integral to the structure of the function.

Apologies all, I am no Javascript master by any means.

share|improve this question
    
That makes no sense, the document has no id, and this_id should probably be this.id, not that it would work that way either ? –  adeneo Jun 18 '13 at 15:54
    
What is this_id here? Your code example doesn't seem to be related to your question. –  Felix Kling Jun 18 '13 at 15:54
    
possible duplicate of Getting the ID of the element that fired an event using jQuery –  Kevin B Jun 18 '13 at 15:56

10 Answers 10

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm guessing the point is to pass event data to a function that expects that, as ,click() supports the .click( [eventData ], handler(eventObject) ) syntax, and if so, you have to iterate the collection yourself:

jQuery(document).ready(function($) {
    $(".lightbox a").each(function() {
        $(this).click({param: this.id}, functionName);
    });
});

EDIT:

You could do this with on() as well:

jQuery(document).ready(function($) {
    $(".lightbox a").each(function() {
        $(this).on('click', {param: this.id}, functionName);
    });
});

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer

Within the click handler, you can access the element ID with this.id or $(this).attr('id'):

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    jQuery(".lightbox a").click(function(){
        functionName(this.id);
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
no need to use anonymous function –  A. Wolff Jun 18 '13 at 16:06
1  
@roasted, indeed it can be done without the anonymous function but for me the anonymous function makes it a little more flexible. Consider if you wanted to call functionName from elsewhere other than an event handler. You would have to set the this context before calling it instead of just passing an ID and if you didn't have a handle on the element, you'd have to also lookup the DOM too. In any app that is not completely trivial, I would not want the function to be dependent on the click.. –  MrCode Jun 18 '13 at 16:11
    
ya, nice point! –  A. Wolff Jun 18 '13 at 16:13

You can use this.id inside a click event, example:

jQuery(".lightbox a").click(function() {
    var id = this.id;

    //pass to a function
    testFunction(id);
});

function testFunction(param) {
    console.log(param);
}
share|improve this answer

It's easy just access to the this element to get the clicked element, then extract its id and save it into a variable like this:

jQuery(".lightbox a").click(function(){
  var id = jQuery(this).attr("id");
  callFunction(id);
});
share|improve this answer
1  
Whenever you write $(this).attr('name') or $(this).prop('name') it's usually better and easier to write this.name. –  Felix Kling Jun 18 '13 at 15:55
    
Thanks, didn't know this approach. –  Skatox Jun 18 '13 at 15:56
3  
Ok, then I will elaborate a bit. $(this).prop('name') is reading the name property of the DOM element this is referring to. But then you can directly access the property and avoid the overhead of creating a jQuery object and call a method (just do this.name). Technically, $(this).attr('name') is equivalent to this.getAttribute('name'), but when working with DOM elements you want the updated DOM properties instead of the HTML attributes, so again, you would just use this.name. –  Felix Kling Jun 18 '13 at 16:00
2  
@FelixKling good explanation. It's like asking someone to pass the sauce instead of just grabbing it yourself. –  MrCode Jun 18 '13 at 16:44

http://jsfiddle.net/pArW6/

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
   jQuery(".lightbox a").click(functionName);
});

function functionName()
{ 
  alert(this.id);   
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for showing the alternate method. –  MrCode Jun 18 '13 at 16:37

You can you Use $(this).att("id").

$(".lightbox a").click(function() {
    var ID=$(this).att("id");

    //pass to a function
    TestFunction(ID);
});

function TestFunction(P) {
    console.log(P);
}

Live example

http://jsbin.com/enobop/1/edit

share|improve this answer

You can do this:

jQuery(document).ready(function () {
    jQuery(".lightbox a").click(function (e) {

        // Cancel the default action (navigation) of the click.
        e.preventDefault();

        // 'this' here refers to the link being clicked in the current scope
        // you can check the console for the id for debug purpose
        console.log(this.id);

        // pass the id to the function
        functionName(this.id);
    });
});
share|improve this answer

Another way is to use the event parameter that gets passed to the callback function.

jQuery(".lightbox a").click(function(ev) {
    console.log(ev.target.id);
}

Of course it's a mix of jQuery and pure JS.

share|improve this answer
    
don't worry, jquery is after all js –  A. Wolff Jun 18 '13 at 16:07

Usually you have a function for an event declared with function(event) and the event has a target and the id of the target is, what you want. So

$("SomeElement").on("click", function(e){ callanotherFunction(e.target.id) })

does, what you wanted

share|improve this answer

You can use this.id or $(this).attr("id");, but you might want to get a reference to $(this) - wrapped or not - immediately and work from a variable if you do much of anything else in there.

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