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Is there any way to get a type of a function by its name/pointer at compile time and use it as a default value for a template's parameter?

Consider the following code:

template <typename TreeNode>
void default_visitor(TreeNode* node)
{
    std::cout << node->data << std::endl;
}

template <typename TreeNode, typename Visitor>
void binary_tree_traverse(TreeNode* root, Visitor visitor)
{
    /* some tree traversal calling the visitor for a node: */
    visitor(root);
}

After that, binary_tree_traverse() can be called with any visitor type, for example:

// call with lambda
binary_tree_traverse(root,
                     [](BinaryTreeNode *node)
                     { std::cout << node->data << std::endl; });

// call with default_visitor() or anything else...
binary_tree_traverse(root, default_visitor<BinaryTreeNode>);

However, I would like to be able also to leave out the visitor parameter and call the function simply like this:

binary_tree_traverse(root);

In this case it should behave as if it is called with default_visitor<>.

The question is how to change the template-function definition accordingy? Something like the following would be an ideal solution:

template <typename TreeNode,
          typename Visitor = ?typeof? default_visitor<TreeNode>>
void binary_tree_traverse(TreeNode* root,
                          Visitor visitor = default_visitor<TreeNode>)
{
    visitor(root);
}

Any idea how to do that? Is it even possible?

An alternative solution could be to use template specialization (or what is a proper name for this?) and define an extra version of the function (the second function parameter can be removed in this case, but the idea is the same):

template<typename TreeNode>
using typeof_default_visitor = void(*)(TreeNode*);

template <typename TreeNode>
void binary_tree_traverse(TreeNode* root,
                          typeof_default_visitor<TreeNode> visitor = default_visitor<TreeNode>)
{
    // call the generic version:
    binary_tree_traverse<TreeNode, typeof_default_visitor<TreeNode>>(root, visitor);
}

But this does not look nice, does it? An extra [dummy] function for the sake of default parameter seems an overkill. What is the right (true C++) way to solve this? What are the options here?

share|improve this question
    
What is binary_tree_print_node? –  Andy Prowl Jun 18 '13 at 16:06
    
Sorry, copy-paste mistake, it's corrected now –  alveko Jun 18 '13 at 16:08
    
Yes, I realized and answered in the meanwhile :) –  Andy Prowl Jun 18 '13 at 16:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I guess you got pretty close to it:

template <typename TreeNode,
          typename Visitor = decltype(default_visitor<TreeNode>)>
void binary_tree_traverse(TreeNode* root,
                          Visitor visitor = default_visitor<TreeNode>)
{
    visitor(root);
}
share|improve this answer

Overload, but with no second argument instead of defaulted one. No, it's not ~overkill~, it's simplest possible solution.

template <typename Node, typename Fn>
void foo(Node* root, Fn&& func) {
    // ...
}

template <typename Node>
void foo(Node* root) {
    foo(root, some_default_func);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Needs more ~~~~tildes~~~~ –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun Jun 18 '13 at 16:18
    
Simplest, maybe, but not the shortest. If no any other good reason to overload it, why to waste space? Or is there any other advantages? Can you also elaborate a bit on what && does here? :) –  alveko Jun 18 '13 at 16:19
    
@alveko Shortest does not mean best, and length matters only in few cases (this is not one of them). && is habit, Google rvalue references/reference collapsing. Probably not needed here. –  Cat Plus Plus Jun 18 '13 at 16:23
    
Simplest also does not mean the best, so any benefits over decltype in this particular case? –  alveko Jun 18 '13 at 16:26
2  
@alveko Less redundant. Possibly easier to understand. (Also you're approaching this from wrong way — simpler is better via KISS so you should instead be asking of benefits of decltype over this) –  Cat Plus Plus Jun 18 '13 at 16:54

decltype and default arguments:

template <typename TreeNode, typename Visitor = decltype(&default_visitor<TreeNode>)>
void binary_tree_traverse(TreeNode* root, Visitor visitor = &default_visitor<TreeNode>)
{
    /* some tree traversal calling the visitor for a node: */
    visitor(root);
}

If that's not available (like with MSVC), just overload the function.

share|improve this answer
    
why &? can it be removed? or any good reason to use it? –  alveko Jun 18 '13 at 16:15
    
@alveko: I like being explicit. Also, without it, Visitor would be a function type, which might cause problems depending on how you use it (like, Visitor copy = visitor;). –  Xeo Jun 18 '13 at 16:22

Just overload the method.

template <typename TreeNode,
          typename Visitor>
void binary_tree_traverse(TreeNode* root,
                          Visitor visitor)
{
    visitor(root);
}
template <typename TreeNode>
void binary_tree_traverse(TreeNode* root)
{
    binary_tree_traverse(root, default_visitor<TreeNode>);
}
share|improve this answer

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