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I expect the output is "Sunday Monday", but the actual output is "Monday Monday",Why this?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
static const char *msg[] = {"Sunday", "Monday", 
"Tuesday", "Wednesday", "Thursday", "Friday", "Saturday"};
char *get_a_day(int idx)
{
    static char buf[20];
    strcpy(buf, msg[idx]);
    return buf;
}

int main(void)
{
    printf("%s %s\n", get_a_day(0), get_a_day(1));
    return 0;
}
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What happens when you use separate printf calls? –  AJMansfield Jun 18 '13 at 17:05
    
sorry I forgot to write a 'return' in last editing... my fault –  world peace Jun 18 '13 at 17:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You declare buf[] as static, which means there will be exactly one memory location shared by all instances.

get_a_day() seems to implicitly return buf[], so both calls to get_a_day() return a pointer to the same buffer.

The first call sets buf[] to "Sunday" and returns a pointer to the memory location of buf. Then the second call sets buf[] to "Monday", overwriting "Sunday", and returns a pointer to the memory location of buf - the same memory location as the first call did. Then the pointer to bufis passed as the 2nd and 3rd arguments to printf. Since buf contains "Monday" (having previously overwritten "Sunday"), printf() prints Monday Monday.

Why does buf need to be static? If you remove this keyword and properly allocate your memory, things should work how you hoped. Also, do you need buf at all? If you just returned msg[i], you'd get the result you expect.

One other thing: you should not be implicitly returning a value like this. Maintainability substantially drops and the intent of the code isn't clear. You should explicitly return the value you mean to return.

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You helped me a lot. thanks! –  world peace Jun 18 '13 at 17:24

If you want an explanation, the other answers explain it well.

If you just want your program to work, this should fix it:

const char *get_a_day(int idx)
{
    return msg[idx];
}
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ye I see it ^_^ thank you –  world peace Jun 18 '13 at 17:26

Its because you are using strcpy. strcpy replaces the entire string in the buffer. As such the second call overwrites the first call (on some platforms the first call will overwrite the second call because they are evaluated in the opposite order). Not to mention the lack of a return. Try this code instead:

char* get_a_day( int idx, char* buf )
{
    strcpy(buf, msg[idx]);
    return buf;
}

int main(void)
{
    char buf0[20];
    char buf1[20];

    printf("%s %s\n", get_a_day(0, buf0), get_a_day(1, buf1));
    return 0;
}
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thank you, I think your code works well –  world peace Jun 18 '13 at 17:21

You should enable all warnings (e.g. compile with gcc -Wall -g) and learn to use a debugger (e.g. gdb).

Notice that your get_a_day function is declared to return a char* but does not return anything (and your compiler would warn you about that). So you have an undefined behavior, and everything could happen (and still conforms to C specifications).

Even if you add return buf; at the end of your get_a_day function, it would return the same pointer, since buf is static (if called twice in a printf like you do).

You should perhaps consider returning a heap allocated string, and have the convention that the caller should free it. But in your particular case, returning msg[idx] is enough.

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Yep should be allocating a new buffer and deleting it at the end. Plus the whole no return thing. –  MrMoDoJoJr Jun 18 '13 at 17:09
    
It doesn't return anything, AND it fills a local buffer buf, which then immediately goes out of existence. He apparently meant to return buf, but that won't work either (actally, it might work despite being wrong). –  Lee Daniel Crocker Jun 18 '13 at 17:09
1  
@LeeDanielCrocker: notice that buf is declared static so the code is not returning a local buffer. –  Basile Starynkevitch Jun 18 '13 at 17:11
    
Ah, so it is. Didn't notice that somehow. Will still have trouble calling it twice inside printf() since there's only one buffer. –  Lee Daniel Crocker Jun 18 '13 at 17:15
    
thank you guys, I got it –  world peace Jun 18 '13 at 17:27

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