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I am trying to make a node that can accept any key value types. So far it works when I use it once, but when I use it another time, I get errors.

Below are the codes I've written:

map.h:

#ifndef Data_Structures_map_h
#define Data_Structures_map_h

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define node(key_t, value_t)    \
    typedef struct node {       \
        key_t key;              \
        value_t value;          \
    } node

#endif /* Data_Structures_map_h */

main.c:

#include <stdio.h>

#include "map.h"

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    node(char*, int);
    node* n = malloc(sizeof(node*));
    n->key = "first";
    n->value = 1;

    printf("the node n has a key of %s and a value of %d.\n", n->key, n->value);

    // error starts from here
    node(char, char*);
    node* n2 = malloc(sizeof(node*));
    n2->key = 'a';
    n2->value = "first";

    printf("the node n2 has a key of %c and value of %s.\n", n2->key, n2->value);

    return 0;
}

What should I do to make it work?

EDIT:

The error is Redefinition of 'node' and the rest are warnings. I'm using Xcode.

share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to implement c++ templates in C ? –  VoidPointer Jun 18 '13 at 17:19
    
Can you edit your answer to include a note of the exact errors you see please? If the errors are at runtime, can you also explain what you'd expected to see happen. –  simonc Jun 18 '13 at 17:19
3  
Your node structs all have the same name. You'll need to decorate it somehow. –  Dave Jun 18 '13 at 17:21
    
@VoidPointer I'm trying to implement a map data structure in C. –  aizen92 Jun 18 '13 at 17:21
1  
@Armin: Take look into man queue and the corresponding header. –  alk Jun 18 '13 at 17:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem is that you're redefining the struct node when you use the macro a second time. You need to somehow make sure that all structs have unique names. Otherwise the compiler will complain about conflicting types and redefinition of structs as seen here.

Example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#define node(name, key_t, value_t)    \
    typedef struct  {                 \
        key_t key;                    \
        value_t value;                \
    } name;                           \

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    node(stringIntNode, char*, int);
    stringIntNode* n = malloc(sizeof(*n));
    n->key = "first";
    n->value = 1;

    printf("the node n has a key of %s and a value of %d.\n", n->key, n->value);

    node(charStringNode, char, char*);
    charStringNode* n2 = malloc(sizeof(*n2));
    n2->key = 'a';
    n2->value = "first";

    printf("the node n2 has a key of %c and value of %s.\n", n2->key, n2->value);

    return 0;
}

Output:

the node n has a key of first and a value of 1.

the node n2 has a key of a and value of first.

share|improve this answer
    
I feel stringIntNode* n = malloc(sizeof(*n)); is more fail-safe. 1+ anyway. –  alk Jun 18 '13 at 17:29
    
@alk Thanks, I changed the code accordingly. –  djf Jun 18 '13 at 17:50
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct node {
    void *key;
    void *value;
} node;

static void *_vp;
#define box(type, value) (_vp = malloc(sizeof(type)), *(type*)_vp=value, _vp)
#define unbox(type, obj) (*(type*)obj)

int main(void) {
    node* n = malloc(sizeof(node));
    n->key = "first";//Reference type as it is
    n->value = box(int, 1);//Value type boxing

    //Reference type cast, Value type unboxing
    printf("the node n has a key of %s and a value of %d.\n", (char*)n->key, unbox(int, n->value));

    node* n2 = malloc(sizeof(node));
    n2->key   = box(char, 'a');
    n2->value = "first";

    printf("the node n2 has a key of %c and value of %s.\n", unbox(char, n2->key), (char*)n2->value);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice approach –  djf Jun 18 '13 at 17:49
    
not much merit. –  BLUEPIXY Jun 18 '13 at 18:04

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