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I know Oracle materialized views cannot be fast refreshed with "not exists" clause. Is there a work around. I tried using left outer join and (+) but these 2 options too didnt seem to work. Any help is appreciated

create materialized view mv_myview refresh fast as 
select a.* 
from tableA a 
where 
    not exists (select * from tableB b where a.my_id = b.my_id); 
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1  
Please show the view's script – Sebas Jun 18 '13 at 18:56
    
create materialized view mv_myview refresh fast as select a.* from tableA a where not exists (select * from tableB b where a.my_id = b.my_id); – Thunderhashy Jun 18 '13 at 19:59

Enabling fast refresh is tricky, there are many strange restrictions and unhelpful error messages. In this case, you need to create a materialized view log WITH ROWID, use the (+) join syntax, and add a ROWID for each table.

create table tablea(my_id number primary key, a number);
create table tableb(my_id number primary key, b number);

create materialized view log on tablea with rowid;
create materialized view log on tableb with rowid;

create materialized view mv_myview refresh fast on commit as 
select a.my_id, a.a, b.b, a.rowid a_rowid, b.rowid b_rowid
from tableA a, tableB b
where a.my_id = b.my_id(+)
    and b.My_id IS NULL;

insert into tablea values(1, 1);
commit;

select * from mv_myview;

MY_ID  A  B  A_ROWID             B_ROWID
-----  -  -  -------             -------
1      1     AAAUH3AAEAAC+t0AAA  
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This works almost to the point where when I do commit, it hangs :-( – Thunderhashy Jun 24 '13 at 14:07
    
Basically I dont see a way where materialized views can support "not in" clause with fast refresh. Is it that Oracle has no way of refreshing fast with "not in" ? – Thunderhashy Jun 24 '13 at 14:26
    
Unfortunately there are a lot of things that could be going wrong here. Perhaps there's a problem with the recursive SQL that updates the materialized view. Look at select * from V$SQL where users_executing > 0 when the commit is running, and then maybe look at the plan. Hopefully just gathering stats would help. Also, you'll probably want to explain the materialized view: begin dbms_mview.explain_mview('MV_MYVIEW'); end;. If that doesn't work you may need to create MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE, which is available in the script utlxmv.sql. – Jon Heller Jun 24 '13 at 18:00
    
(I'd post the create table script in that file, but SO is giving me an error when I try that.) What version are you on? It works for me on 11.2.0.3. You may need to post your full DDL and some scripts to create sample data for us to reproduce the issue. Sorry for all the questions. In my experience, materialized views are always difficult to work with. – Jon Heller Jun 24 '13 at 18:06

Executing your query under oracle 11, I've got the following error:

NOT EXISTS

Using a LEFT JOIN, I had the same problem:

create materialized view mv_myview refresh fast as 
select a.* 
from tableA a LEFT JOIN tableB b ON a.my_id = b.my_id
where 
    b.id IS NULL; 

LEFT JOIN

Same problem using NOT IN...

create materialized view mv_myview refresh fast as 
select a.* 
from tableA a 
where 
    a.my_id not in (select b.my_id from tableB b); 

NOT IN

First aid informations are quite clear:

ORA-12015: cannot create a fast refresh materialized view from a complex query Cause: Neither ROWIDs and nor primary key constraints are supported for complex queries. Action: Reissue the command with the REFRESH FORCE or REFRESH COMPLETE option or create a simple materialized view.

The problem seems impossible. You'll have to change the view type.

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I can't think of a complete workaround. If the antijoin resulting from the not exists is inefficient for some reason then you could create a fast refresh MV based on optimising that:

select my_id, count(*)
from   tab
group by my_id

Antijoins are usually pretty efficient though. You're not just missing an index are you?

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This is an interesting idea though.. – Thunderhashy Jun 24 '13 at 14:36

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