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I'm programming with Keil uVision 4.

I have some code like this:

sbit X = P3 ^ 3; // X is third bit of P3 register

...

    while (1) {
      X = !X; // X equals not X ?!

      if (X == 0)
        printf("0");
      else
        printf("1");
    }

I can control `P3^3 generic input pin, because on this pin i've got a PIR (pulse infrared sensor). It gives me 1 on that line when it is blinking, 0 when it is sleeping.

when P3^3 is pulled-up to 1, output is (as expected) 10101010101010..

When it is still to 0, output is (as not expected) 0000000000000..

The behaviour I'm obtaing is that I described above, considering that sbit X is setted/unsetted by PIR..

So the question is, what is the meaning of the operator ! in the Keil C51 compiler?

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The documentation states that an sbit cannot be declared inside a function, so I am also assuming that this code fragment is elided? It isn ormal to indicate that with an elipsis (...) –  Clifford Jun 18 '13 at 19:19
    
Just to be clear, it might be helpful to describe the expected output when the input is low, since on analysis I think it is behaving correctly (i.e. as coded) given the hardware and the semantics of the sbit language extension. –  Clifford Jun 18 '13 at 19:25
    
yes the scope is the global one. i'm expecting pretty much the same output that i had when line was high. Pratically, I was thinking that ! is the same of ~. –  Filippo Lauria Jun 18 '13 at 20:32
    
The expression X = !X changes P3.3 from an input to an output and vice versa. X is a reference to the pin, not an independent variable in memory. –  Clifford Jun 19 '13 at 11:09
    
Regarding being clear regarding the output, I expected you to modify the question rather than comment on it. –  Clifford Jun 19 '13 at 11:15
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In Keil C51, to quote the manual:

The sbit type defines a bit within a special function register (SFR)

So you are not declaring a variable X and reading it once before the loop, rather you are defining a reference to P3.3, and reading it's state on every iteration of the loop. That is to say that X is a reference to the hardware I/O pin register, not a variable.

Despite appearances sbit is not a simple typedef alias and the ^ is not a bitwise XOR operator. Rather it defines a reference to a bit addressable register. Assigning X writes to the hardware register - the behaviour is then defined by the hardware in this case rather than the language. The ability to apparently change the value of X when it is externally pulled high, I am guessing is in the nature of the GPIO hardware rather than any strange behaviour of the ! operator. Check the hardware documentation for I/O pin behaviour, but I am guessing again that pulling it high makes the pin output-capable

To get the behaviour (I imagine) you expect you would code it thus:

sbit p = P3 ^ 3; // p is third bit of P3 register


...
int X = p ; // get p's current value

while (1) {
  X = !X; // X equals not X ?!

  if (X == 0)
    printf("0");
  else
    printf("1");
}
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Sorry for being not clear, on P3^3 i've got a PIR (pulse infrared sensor). It gives me 1 on that line when it is blinking, 0 when it is sleeping. The behaviour I'm obtaing is that I described above, considering that sbit X is setted/unsetted by PIR. –  Filippo Lauria Jun 18 '13 at 20:17
1  
@FilippoLauria: I was referring the MCU GPIO hardware rather then the hardware you have connected to the pin. I believe that on 8051, a port is configured as an input by writing zero to it, which allows it to be asserted externally. You write 1 to the pin to set it as an input, thereafter you should only read it - you are writing to it in the expression X = !X, so you are toggling it between an input and an output in the while loop. As I said, check the documentation for your MCU. –  Clifford Jun 19 '13 at 11:07
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Presumably it means the same thing it means in standard C. !x evaluates to 1 if x==0, or to 0 otherwise. The result is of type int.

If you're looking for a bitwise complement that inverts all the bits, you want the ~ operator.

UPDATE :

There's more to it than that; see Clifford's answer.

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I think that c51 is an extension of standard C. If what you said is right, why compiler doesn't give me an error (or a warning) when I'm trying to assign an int to a sbit ? –  Filippo Lauria Jun 18 '13 at 20:19
    
@FilippoLauria: I don't know; quite possibly I'm wrong. I'm familiar with C, not with Keil C51. Do you get a warning when you explicitly assign an int value to an sbit? –  Keith Thompson Jun 18 '13 at 20:24
    
I've tried ( int x = 1; sbit y = P3^3; ... y = x; ) no warnings are triggered off. Maybe is like you said, and for some reason unknown to me, the behaviour is, in my opinion, strange. –  Filippo Lauria Jun 18 '13 at 20:40
1  
@KeithThompson: Assigning a value to an sbit changes the state of the pin referenced by the sbit. I have linked to the documentation of sbit in my answer. –  Clifford Jun 19 '13 at 11:13
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