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Here's the very dumb way:

def divisorGenerator(n):
    for i in xrange(1,n/2+1):
        if n%i == 0: yield i
    yield n

The result I'd like to get is similar to this one, but I'd like a smarter algorithm (this one it's too much slow and dumb :-)

I can find prime factors and their multiplicity fast enough. I've an generator that generates factor in this way:

(factor1, multiplicity1)
(factor2, multiplicity2)
(factor3, multiplicity3)
and so on...

i.e. the output of

for i in factorGenerator(100):
    print i

is:

(2, 2)
(5, 2)

I don't know how much is this useful for what I want to do (I coded it for other problems), anyway I'd like a smarter way to make

for i in divisorGen(100):
    print i

output this:

1
2
4
5
10
20
25
50
100


UPDATE: Many thanks to Greg Hewgill and his "smart way" :) Calculating all divisors of 100000000 took 0.01s with his way against the 39s that the dumb way took on my machine, very cool :D

UPDATE 2: Stop saying this is a duplicate of this post. Calculating the number of divisor of a given number doesn't need to calculate all the divisors. It's a different problem, if you think it's not then look for "Divisor function" on wikipedia. Read the questions and the answer before posting, if you do not understand what is the topic just don't add not useful and already given answers.

share|improve this question
    
The reason that it was suggested that this question was almost a duplicate of the "Algorithm to calculate the number of divisors of a given number" was that the suggested first step in that question was to find all of the divisors, which I believe is exactly what you were trying to do? –  Andrew Edgecombe Oct 5 '08 at 22:43
    
You might be interested in this stack-exchange proposal. It's almost ready to begin beta, just needs a few more. –  greatwolf Jan 19 '11 at 5:21
    
Andrew in order to find how many divisors there are you simply have to find the prime factors and then use them to count how much divisors there might be. Finding divisors isn't needed in that case. –  Loïc Faure-Lacroix Aug 13 '11 at 23:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 40 down vote accepted

Given your factorGenerator function, here is a divisorGen that should work:

def divisorGen(n):
    factors = list(factorGenerator(n))
    nfactors = len(factors)
    f = [0] * nfactors
    while True:
        yield reduce(lambda x, y: x*y, [factors[x][0]**f[x] for x in range(nfactors)], 1)
        i = 0
        while True:
            f[i] += 1
            if f[i] <= factors[i][1]:
                break
            f[i] = 0
            i += 1
            if i >= nfactors:
                return

The overall efficiency of this algorithm will depend entirely on the efficiency of the factorGenerator.


In essence, this algorithm is doing the following:

factors = prime1 ^ 0 * prime2 ^ 0 * ... primeN ^ 0;
          prime1 ^ 0 * prime2 ^ 0 * ... primeN ^ 1;
            ...          ...        ...   ...     ;
          prime2 ^ i * prime2 ^ j * ... primeN ^ k;

Where i, j, and k are the multiplicity of the prime factor. Given n = 100:

# Prime factors are 5, and 2 with a multiplicity of 2 for each

5 ^ 0 * 2 ^ 0 = 1
5 ^ 0 * 2 ^ 1 = 2
5 ^ 0 * 2 ^ 2 = 4
5 ^ 1 * 2 ^ 0 = 5
...
5 ^ 2 * 2 ^ 2 = 100
share|improve this answer
    
wow it took 0.01 for calculating all divisors of 100000000 against the 39s that took the dumb way (stopping at n/2) very cool, thank you! –  Andrea Ambu Oct 5 '08 at 10:20
10  
For those of us who don't understand Pythonese, what is this actually doing? –  Matthew Scharley Oct 7 '08 at 13:24
    
monoxide: this computes all multiplicative combinations of the given factors. Most of it should be self-explanatory; the "yield" line is like a return but keeps going after returning a value. [0]*nfactors creates a list of zeros of length nfactors. reduce(...) computes the product of the factors. –  Greg Hewgill Oct 7 '08 at 22:33
    
The reduce and lambda notation were the parts that were actually confusing me. I tried implementing an algorithm to do this in C# using a recursive function to walk array of factors and multiply them all together, but it seems to have horrible performance on numbers like 1024 that have many factors –  Matthew Scharley Oct 8 '08 at 9:17
1  
Why not use operator.mul? –  Speckinius Flecksis Oct 23 '12 at 18:40

To expand on what Shimi has said, you should only be running your loop from 1 to the square root of n. Then to find the pair, do n / i, and this will cover the whole problem space.

As was also noted, this is a NP, or 'difficult' problem. Exhaustive search, the way you are doing it, is about as good as it gets for guaranteed answers. This fact is used by encryption algorithms and the like to help secure them. If someone were to solve this problem, most if not all of our current 'secure' communication would be rendered insecure.

Python code:

def divisorGenerator(n):
    large_divisors = []
    for i in xrange(1, int(math.sqrt(n) + 1)):
        if n % i is 0:
            yield i
            if i is not n / i:
                large_divisors.insert(0, n / i)
    for divisor in large_divisors:
        yield divisor

print list(divisorGenerator(100))

Which should output a list like:

[1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, 100]
share|improve this answer
    
Because, once you have a list of elements between 1..10, you can generate any of the elements between 11..100 trivialy. You get {1, 2, 4, 5, 10}. Divide 100 by each of these elements and you {100, 50, 20, 25, 10}. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 5 '08 at 11:40
    
Factors are ALWAYS generated in pairs, by virtue of the definition. By only searching to sqrt(n), you're cutting your work by a power 2. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 5 '08 at 11:42
    
It's very faster than the version in my post, but it's still too slow than the version using prime factors –  Andrea Ambu Oct 5 '08 at 12:24
    
I agree this isn't the best solution. I was simply pointing out a 'better' way of doing the 'dumb' search that would already save alot of time. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 5 '08 at 12:39
    
Factorization has not been shown to be NP-hard. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integer_factorization And the problem was to find all the divisors given that the prime factors (the hard part) had already been found. –  Jamie Oct 11 '08 at 0:46

I like Greg solution, but I wish it was more python like. I feel it would be faster and more readable; so after some time of coding I came out with this.

The first two functions are needed to make the cartesian product of lists. And can be reused whnever this problem arises. By the way, I had to program this myself, if anyone knows of a standard solution for this problem, please feel free to contact me.

"Factorgenerator" now returns a dictionary. And then the dictionary is fed into "divisors", who uses it to generate first a list of lists, where each list is the list of the factors of the form p^n with p prime. Then we make the cartesian product of those lists, and we finally use Greg' solution to generate the divisor. We sort them, and return them.

I tested it and it seem to be a bit faster than the previous version. I tested it as part of a bigger program, so I can't really say how much is it faster though.

Pietro Speroni (pietrosperoni dot it)

from math import sqrt


##############################################################
### cartesian product of lists ##################################
##############################################################

def appendEs2Sequences(sequences,es):
    result=[]
    if not sequences:
        for e in es:
            result.append([e])
    else:
        for e in es:
            result+=[seq+[e] for seq in sequences]
    return result


def cartesianproduct(lists):
    """
    given a list of lists,
    returns all the possible combinations taking one element from each list
    The list does not have to be of equal length
    """
    return reduce(appendEs2Sequences,lists,[])

##############################################################
### prime factors of a natural ##################################
##############################################################

def primefactors(n):
    '''lists prime factors, from greatest to smallest'''  
    i = 2
    while i<=sqrt(n):
        if n%i==0:
            l = primefactors(n/i)
            l.append(i)
            return l
        i+=1
    return [n]      # n is prime


##############################################################
### factorization of a natural ##################################
##############################################################

def factorGenerator(n):
    p = primefactors(n)
    factors={}
    for p1 in p:
        try:
            factors[p1]+=1
        except KeyError:
            factors[p1]=1
    return factors

def divisors(n):
    factors = factorGenerator(n)
    divisors=[]
    listexponents=[map(lambda x:k**x,range(0,factors[k]+1)) for k in factors.keys()]
    listfactors=cartesianproduct(listexponents)
    for f in listfactors:
        divisors.append(reduce(lambda x, y: x*y, f, 1))
    divisors.sort()
    return divisors



print divisors(60668796879)

P.S. it is the first time I am posting to stackoverflow. I am looking forward for any feedback.

share|improve this answer
    
In Python 2.6 there is a itertools.product(). –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 17 '08 at 1:07
    
A version that use generators instead of list.append everywhere could be cleaner. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 17 '08 at 1:10
    
Sieve of Eratosthenes could be used to generate prime numbers less then or equal sqrt(n) stackoverflow.com/questions/188425/project-euler-problem#193605 –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 17 '08 at 1:17
1  
Coding style: exponents = [k**x for k, v in factors.items() for x in range(v+1)] –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 17 '08 at 1:23
    
For listexponents: [[k**x for x in range(v+1)] for k,v in factors.items()] –  klenwell Sep 9 '12 at 16:24

Adapted from CodeReview, here is a variant which works with num=1 !

from itertools import product
import operator

def prod(ls):
   return reduce(operator.mul, ls, 1)

def powered(factors, powers):
   return prod(f**p for (f,p) in zip(factors, powers))


def divisors(num) :

   pf = dict(prime_factors(num))
   primes = pf.keys()
   #For each prime, possible exponents
   exponents = [range(i+1) for i in pf.values()]
   return (powered(primes,es) for es in product(*exponents))
share|improve this answer

Assuming that the factors function returns the factors of n (for instance, factors(60) returns the list [2, 2, 3, 5]), here is a function to compute the divisors of n:

function divisors(n)
    divs := [1]
    for fact in factors(n)
        temp := []
        for div in divs
            if fact * div not in divs
                append fact * div to temp
        divs := divs + temp
    return divs
share|improve this answer
    
Is that python ? Anyway, it's not python 3.x for sure. –  GinKin Mar 20 at 18:04
    
It's pseudocode, which ought to be simple to translate to python. –  user448810 Mar 20 at 18:23
return [x for x in range(n+1) if n/x==int(n/x)]
share|improve this answer
1  
The questioner asked for a better algorithm, not just a prettier format. –  Veedrac Jun 1 at 19:40

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