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Check out this jsfiddle.

http://jsfiddle.net/PRqZg/

HTML

<div class="colors" id="section_1"></div>
<div class="colors" id="section_2"></div>
<div class="colors" id="section_3"></div>
<div class="colors" id="section_4"></div>
<div class="colors" id="section_5"></div>
<div class="colors" id="section_6"></div>
<div class="colors" id="section_7"></div>
<div class="colors" id="section_8"></div>
<div class="colors" id="section_9"></div>
<div class="colors" id="section_10"></div>

JS

function doAjax(i)
{   
    var data = {json:"{\"x\": 1}"};

    $.ajax({
        url:"/echo/json/",
        data:"json"     
    })
    .done(function(result){
        $('#section_'+i).toggleClass('color2');         
    })          
    .always(function(){     
        setTimeout(function(){doAjax(i)}, 500);
    });
}

$(document).ready(function(){

    var obs = $('.colors');
    for(i = 0;i <= obs.length;i++)
    {
        doAjax(i);
    };
});

CSS

.colors {display:inline-block;width:100%;height:40px;border:1px solid #000;}
.color2 {background:red;}

I broke this down to the simplest example I can think of. My end software, is going to need to run a recurring separate ajax request for each element on a page, so I can't at this time consider lumping it all into one request.

So in my fiddle, I made 7 simple divs, and just want to toggle a class on them after a successful ajax request, hence my simple example. In chrome, as I expect since the request is asynchronous, all of the divs toggle the class at the same time(or at least close enough to trick the human eye). THis is even working in IE (albeit with a bit of a delay to the point where I notice a flicker).

However, in firefox, it appears that each ajax requests done() function doesn't fire until the previous one is finished. After some research I even found that firefox can run 6 concurrent requests to the same host at a time before it starts queuing them. But it seems like that should yield the result presented in the fiddle but on a scale of every six requests instead of every one. ALso, I observe the same behavior if I decrease the number of divs down to under 6.

Is this a bug in firefox or am I missing something? Because if this is its default performance it seems pretty bad considering all thats being done is toggling a class.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

it turns out Firefox has a really stupid behavior that makes it queue up ajax requests to the exact same url so that their success functions get fired off one after another. The workaround for this is to append a random variable number to the ajx url itself. I'm not sure if this is a workaround behind a weird behavior or just a necessity due to firefox's caching method.

Note: I'm actually passing the timestamp in deciseconds 1s/100 so if you ever had something that was firing more than once every tenth of a second you would need to divide the timestamp by a smaller value.

change js to this:

function doAjax(i)
{   
    var data = {json:"{\"x\": 1}"};
    var rand = new Date().getTime() / 100;
    $.ajax({
        url:"/echo/json/?rand="+rand,
        data:"json"     
    })
    .done(function(result){
        $('#section_'+i).toggleClass('color2');         
    })          
    .always(function(){     
        setTimeout(function(){doAjax(i)}, 500);
    });
}

$(document).ready(function(){

    var obs = $('.colors');
    for(i = 0;i <= obs.length;i++)
    {
        doAjax(i);
    };
});

see this fiddle for working example: http://jsfiddle.net/Zv2R2/1/

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